Category Archives: Fun!

The Historic Games Collection

Also in the spirit of Penn’s Year of Games, we interviewed Penn Museum Registrar Chrisso Boulis about the historic games collection. The beautifully crafted paper prints are the predecessors to the games (that require essentially no skill) like Candyland and Chutes and Ladders that we know so well. In the video Chrisso talks a bit […]

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The Year of Games

In recognition of the “Year of Games” here at Penn, I searched ‘games’ on the Expedition magazine webpage. It turns out, the magazine has published articles about games for decades! Children’s Games (How do you say eeny, meeny, miny, mo in Turkish? Ena, mena, donsi donsi donsi!) Astragali, the Ubiquitous Gaming Pieces (near and dear […]

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Can You Caption This Photo?

Please write my caption here or here!

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Narcissus

Spring, by small degrees, is inspiring the bulbs to show off their blooms in the the courtyard at the Penn Museum. The daffodils, with oddly narrow trumpets, are nodding visitors inside as if to say, “The Silk Road mummies may be gone, but we still have a really cool exhibit here! I swear! I’m a […]

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Fun Friday Image of the Week – Woman Smoking a Water Pipe, Iran 1932

A woman water pipe smoker “Kaliunchi” (‘nargilah’ in Arabic and Turkish) in a teahouse in Damghan, Semnan Province, Iran in 1932. Penn Museum Image #83371. Iran was an important part of the Silk Road trading routes. One of the many food items traded along the silk road was pistachios, a main export of Damghan. At […]

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Fun Friday Images of the Week: Camels!

Since we started planning for Secrets of the Silk Road, almost every powerpoint presentation I’ve seen has been festooned with pictures of camels. We’ve spent many a coffee break needling over whether or not the camels peppering the latest powerpoint were Bactrians or Dromedaries. Bactrian camels have two humps! Surely, you knew that already. At […]

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Fun Friday Image of the Week – Bororo Boy in Brazil

George Rawls (left) and a Bororo boy named Tari (right) during the Penn Museum’s Matto Grosso Expedition in Brasil, 1941 My former  archivist colleagues were charged with the task of scrubbing the Archives Image Database. Out of their own genuine love for the collection (and not due to a lack of work, mind you) they created […]

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“We Found Better Stuff!”

Every day I walk though the  Archaeologists & Travelers in Ottoman Lands to get to my office and I’m reminded of a rather funny commercial for Snapple. There’s a striking resemblance between the explorer who exclaims, “We Found Better Stuff!” and Osman Hamdi Bey who is a key subject in our Archaeologists & Travelers in […]

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Fun Friday Image of the Week – The Sphinx

Sphinx of Ramesses II in front of the Main Entrance of the Penn Museum, covered with snow. The Sphinx was moved into the building in 1916, and the Lower Egyptian Gallery was built around the sphinx in 1926. Penn Museum image 140759. I just rubbed my hands together and blew into them to get them […]

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Fun Friday Image of the Week – 2,500 Year-old Dress Looks Like New

Pullover wool dress, ca. 5th-3rd century BCE. Excavated from Tomb No. 55 of Cemetery No. 1, Zaghunluq, Charchan, Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region, China. © Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region Museum. This is one of the objects coming to the Penn Museum in the Secrets of the Silk Road exhibition in February 2011. I am trying to […]

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