University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology

Category: The Mediterranean


How Dirty Can You Get While Excavating a Roman Bath? – Emma Brown

The happy author in her square. Photo by Jenny McCarthy.

By: Anne Tiballi

Most of my summers have been spent working in research laboratories, but this year I left the bench to do some literal dirty work on an archaeological dig. I went to Italy as part of a field school to excavate a bath in the Roman city of Carsulae, located on the Via Flaminia, a trade […]


After Excavation Ends, the Real Work Begins – Kurtis Tanaka

Byzantinist George Makris resurveying fields. Photo by Kurtis Tanaka.

By: Anne Tiballi

For a grad student in archaeology, summers usually mean being on the move, to sites, cities, and schools. Certainly this was true of mine—a simplified itinerary would look something like this: Athens, Rome, Athens, Berlin, Thessaloniki, Komotini, Istanbul, and Athens again. A peripatetic summer such as this reflects the many necessities and duties (or perhaps […]


Processing Pottery in Kenchreai – Gavin Blasdel

Using a Munsell chart to examine one of the several hundred small-handled stoppers discovered at Threpsiades. Photo by Jayse Weaver.

By: Anne Tiballi

Summer. To me, it means two things: Greece and archaeology. For the past four years I have spent all or most of my summers in the country doing archaeological work. It all started in 2013 when my advisor Joseph L. Rife at Vanderbilt University, where I was an M.A. student in Classical Studies, invited me […]


Megara and a Mole-Hill: Roman Villa Excavation in Transylvania – Jordan Rogers

Christian, one of the reenactors, told me my head was too fat for his helmet! Photo credit: Corinne Watts.

By: Anne Tiballi

Even with training in classics and ancient history, my knowledge of the province of Roman Dacia, incorporated into the Roman Empire after Trajan’s two major campaigns in 101-2 and 105-6 CE against the Dacian king Decebalus, was partial at best before embarking on my first excavation. The lack of literary evidence concerning the campaigns, the […]


The New World of Old World Plants – Alexandria Mitchem

Me and two other students working to set up the flotation tank. Photo by Dr. Chantel White.

By: Anne Tiballi

This summer, I was fortunate to be able to go into the field with Dr. Chantel White to explore the sub-discipline of archaeobotany, the study of ancient plant remains. I have been in the field before, spending last summer learning to dig with Dr. Megan Kassabaum. Upon my return, I conducted research for my senior […]


A Tale of Two Sacred Sites – Anna Sitz

Sieve, Corinth (Photo: P. Katz)

By: Sarah Linn

Every year, the Penn Museum provides support to Penn undergraduates and graduate students as they deepen their understanding of the human experience outside the Museum’s walls. Follow these blog posts from our intrepid young scholars as they report on the sights and sites that they encounter throughout their travels in the field. An archaeologist’s life […]


Back to the Baths: Season 3 at Cosa – Sophie Crawford-Brown

Aerial view of our excavation area. The round outline of the laconicum is visible on the left (photo by Matthew Brennan).

By: Anne Tiballi

Every year, the Penn Museum provides support to Penn undergraduates and graduate students as they deepen their understanding of the human experience outside the Museum’s walls. Follow these blog posts from our intrepid young scholars as they report on the sights and sites that they encounter throughout their travels in the field. At the beginning […]


From Lawyer to Gladiator: John J. Ebel and his Gladiator School

Johnasmurmillo

By: Brittany MacLean

“Suiting up” means two things for John J. Ebel. As both a trial attorney in New York and co-founder of the Ludus Magnus Gladiatores Reenacting Group, Ebel is no stranger to battle. In preparation for the Penn Museum’s celebration of Rome’s Birthday April 18, at which gladiators from Ludus Magnus will vie to “win the […]


The Corinth Excavations

Corinth L-29-10-11 by the Painter of KP 14

By: Ann Brownlee

I am writing from the site of Ancient Corinth, where excavations under the auspices of the American School of Classical Studies at Athens have been going on since the late 19th century.  The Corinth Excavations have been a training ground for generations of archaeologists, including me, and I thank the director, Guy Sanders, and assistant […]


Updates from Thrace

Basketball in Pagouria: Tom Tartaron (UPenn), Elias Koytsoykanidis, Periklis Chrysafakoglou (Demokrates University, Komotini), and Simon Oswald (UCLA)

By: Samuel Holzman

The Molyvoti, Thrace Archaeological Project is a combined excavation/survey conducted jointly between Princeton University and the 19th  Ephorate of Prehistoric and Classical Antiquities of Komotini, Greece. It includes a fieldschool for undergraduates from Princeton as well as the University of Pennsylvania and Demokrates University, and a merry band of Penn archaeologists, including three graduate students […]


The Golden Age of King Midas

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