University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology

Welcome to the Penn Museum blog. First launched in January 2009, the Museum blog now has over 800 posts covering a range of topics in the categories of Museum, Collection, Exhibitions, Research, and By Location. Here you’ll hear directly from our staff and Penn students about their work, research, experiences, and discoveries. To explore the Museum's other digital content, visit The Digital Penn Museum.

Sealings, Snakes, and Sacred Lakes: A Report from the 2015 Summer Season at Abydos – Part 1- Paul Verhelst

My kufti Ramadan, in the tan gellabiya, oversees the excavation of my unit in the areryt debris deposit. Excavation in Wah-sut usually involves removing the debris mounds from past excavations and the garbage that accumulates from the modern village of el-Araba.

By: Sarah Linn

Every year, the Penn Museum provides support to Penn undergraduates and graduate students as they deepen their understanding of the human experience outside the Museum’s walls. Follow these blog posts from our intrepid young scholars as they report on the sights and sites that they encounter throughout their travels in the field. Every excavation season […]

Read the Blog Post

LiDAR Scans and Sacred Lakes: A Report from the 2014 Summer Season at Abydos- Part 1

A LiDAR scan of Senebkay’s tomb

By: Paul Verhelst

This summer at Abydos promised to be a busy and exciting season. The Penn research team (dubbed Team Hafla, which is Arabic for “party”) returned to Abydos after an exciting winter season with the discovery of King Senebkay and the Lost Abydos Dynasty. We were ready to continue exploring the cemetery around Senebkay as well […]

Read the Blog Post

Rediscovering a Forgotten Egyptian Pharaoh: A Penn Student’s Experience in the Field

Excavation site

By: Tom Stanley

In January, researchers from the Penn Museum made an historic discovery in Abydos, Egypt—unearthing the tomb and skeletal remains of a previously unknown pharaoh, Woseribre Senebkay, who reigned in the 17th century BCE. The finding was the culmination of work at the site that began in summer 2013 by a team led by Dr. Josef […]

Read the Blog Post

Colossal Head of Ramses II [Object of the Day #45]

Ramses II

By: Josef Wegner

Almost all Egyptian gods and goddesses could take the form of an animal. Osiris, the god of the dead, never developed animal associations. That is because he symbolizes the idea of the mummified pharaoh. To the ancient Egyptians, Osiris was the first mummy in history and every person whose body was mummified was following in […]

Read the Blog Post

The Golden Age of King Midas

© Penn Museum 2016 Sitemap / Contact / Copyright / Disclaimer / Privacy /