University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology

Lantern Slide Salon: The Adventures of Furness, Harrison, and Hiller in Color

Tegang, a Dayak from Borneo was the guide of William Henry Furness III, Alfred C. Harrison, Jr., and Hiram M. Hiller on their trip to the interior of the island, 1896-1897.  Photograph by Alfred C. Harrison, Jr.; hand-colored by Katharine Gordon Breed.  Penn Museum image 216350

By: Alessandro Pezzati

In its 125-year history, the Penn Museum has sent out anthropological and archaeological expeditions throughout the world.  Between 1895 and 1903, three young men affiliated with the University of Pennsylvania undertook several expeditions to the Far East.  Their principal destination was the island of Borneo, to traverse the interior of the island and collect ethnological […]

Ainu Robe from Japan [Object of the Day #31]

Ainu Robe

By: Stephen Lang

This Ainu robe was collected by  Hiram M. Hiller (1867-1921) a physician and amateur ethnologist during a trip to Hokkaido, the northern most island of Japan. The trip itself lasted only a month but covered an area stretching from the southern coastal villages of Hokkaido, near Shiraoi (where this piece comes from), to a circuit around […]


By: Maureen Callahan

Philadelphia is expecting many of inches of snow, and the weather should start any minute now. It’s safe to say that the city has descended into a full-throated freak-out. So, let’s put it in perspective with some snow photos from the archives! So remember, if you’re going to go out, bring your parka made from […]

The Ainu People and an Early Anthropological Friendship Across an Ocean

By: Alison Miner

Given this rhetoric, and the colonial relationship between the Japanese government and the Ainu peoples, it is not surprising that their culture was not well studied for many years. In 1900, however, a traveler from Philadelphia, Hiram Hiller, took a detour from his pan-Asian journeys to visit Hokkaido. He met Jenichiro Oyabe, a Japanese man who was educated as a missionary, but who became a self-trained ethnographer of the Ainu people.

© Penn Museum 2015 Sitemap / Contact / Copyright / Disclaimer / Privacy /