University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology
1 - of 19 Records

Num results: 19

Objects

Amulet

Amulet

Object Number:31-27-272
Place Name:Egypt, Meydum
Period:Twenty-Second Dynasty
Culture:

Description

Gold aegis of Sekhet amulet

Canopic Jar Lid

Canopic Jar Lid

Object Number:E1869B
Place Name:Egypt, Thebes, Egypt
Period:Third Intermediate Period, Twenty-Second Dynasty
Culture:

Description

Traces of red and blue paint. Imseti.

Canopic Jar Lid

Canopic Jar Lid

Object Number:E1870B
Place Name:Egypt, Thebes, Egypt
Period:Third Intermediate Period, Twenty-Second Dynasty
Culture:

Description

Text names Duamutef (canine head), but the head that fits this jar depicts Hapi (baboon head). Traces of red and blue paint.

Canopic Jar Lid

Canopic Jar Lid

Object Number:E1871B
Place Name:Thebes, Egypt
Period:Third Intermediate Period, Twenty-Second Dynasty
Culture:

Description

Traces of red and blue paint. Duamutef.

Amulet Object On Display

Amulet

Object Number:31-27-258
Place Name:Egypt, Meydum
Period:Twenty-Second Dynasty
Culture:

Description

Green

Statue Object On Display

Statue

Object Number:E10751
Place Name:Sudan, Nubia, Buhen
Period:Middle Kingdom, Twelfth Dynasty, Thirteenth Dynasty
Culture:

Description

Standing Statue of Merer wearing a long, high-waisted kilt. His head is shaved/bald. His left foot is advanced in a striding pose. There is an inscription on the base with a dedication to Ptah-Sokar and identifying him: "The gardener Merer, born of the lady of the house Neferu."

Amulet

Amulet

Object Number:29-72-2
Place Name:Egypt, Mit-Rahineh
Period:
Culture:

Description

Light green fading white. Fitting mould 29-72-1. Feather crown broken off present. No base ever made for figure

Stela Object On Display

Stela

Object Number:E6878
Place Name:Egypt, Abydos
Period:Egyptian Early Dynastic, First Dynasty
Culture:

Description

Stela of King Ka'a of black quartzite inscribed with the Horus name of the King. This stela is decorated with a serekh (a rectangle with paneled lower half) surmounted by an image of the falcon god Horus. The Horus-name was the oldest element of the pharaoh’s titulary and associated him with the falcon god. The two large pieces of this stela were discovered at Abydos during separate excavations of the Early Dynastic royal cemetery. The fragments were reunited at Penn Museum in 1903.

Royal Shawabti Object On Display

Royal Shawabti

Object Number:92-2-69
Place Name:Sudan, Nuri
Period:
Culture: Napatan

Description

Shawabti of King Senkamenisken. Wears wig, crown and false beard; arms crossed; holds hoe in one and basket strap in other. Six registers of hieroglyphis on on front; mark on base.

Coffin Box

Coffin Box

Object Number:E14344B
Place Name:Egypt, Thebes (uncertain) (Egypt)
Period:Third Intermediate Period, Twenty-First Dynasty, Twenty-Second Dynasty
Culture:

Description

This anthropoid mummy case is made of cartonnage, a material consisting of several layers of linen or papyrus pasted together and covered by a thin layer of plaster and painted. The case originally contained the mummy of a man named Nebnetcheru, who was a priest with the title of God’s Father of Amun at Karnak Temple.
A djed-pillar, a symbol of Osiris, decorates the back of this cartonnage case. Placed along the spine, the djed-pillar also represents stability. There is an ankh, the symbol for “life”, at the back of the head. Additional decorative elements include depictions of the four sons of Horus and tyet-amulets. Stitching down the center back indicates how the cartonnage was originally sealed around the mummy. When acquired in 1924, the case was intact and closed. It was opened in 1933 to remove the mummy (E14344A). The lid (E14344C) is now separate.

Royal Shawabti

Royal Shawabti

Object Number:92-2-71
Place Name:Sudan, Nuri
Period:
Culture: Napatan

Description

Shawabti belonging to a Queen - Amanimalel? Mummiform with hoe in proper right hand and basket strap in proper left, arms crossed.

Canopic Jar

Canopic Jar

Object Number:E1869A
Place Name:Egypt, Thebes, Egypt
Period:Third Intermediate Period, Twenty-Second Dynasty
Culture:

Description

Belongs with lid (B) - head of Imsety (human head). Traces of red and blue paint.

Cartonnage

Cartonnage

Object Number:52-11-1
Place Name:Egypt
Period:
Culture:

Description

Fragment of upper portion of anthropoid mummy case. Painted decoration includes Osiris and inscription - name of owner.

Statuette Object On Display

Statuette

Object Number:57-18-1
Place Name:Egypt, Thebes (uncertain) (Egypt), Buto (uncertain)
Period:Twenty-Sixth Dynasty
Culture: Meroitic

Description

Composite limestone statuette consisting of a statue of a female serpent deity in front and a stela in back. The goddess has the body of a cobra and a human head. She wears a tall plumed headdress with horned sun disk. On the sides of the statue are representations in sunk relief of the goddesses Nekhbet and Wadjet and a text referring to Psammetichus I. Stela at back depicts a king with the god Horus, but is unfinished.

Statue Object On Display

Statue

Object Number:E635
Place Name:Egypt, Heracleopolis
Period:New Kingdom, Nineteenth Dynasty
Culture:

Description

Heroic seated statue of Ramesses II. Enthroned king has traces of red on flesh and wears blue / yellow striped Nemes headddress. Deep cut inscriptions on the throne and base bear the names and titles of Ramesses II: on the base he is said to be beloved of Herishef; perhaps usurped by Ramesses II from an earlier statue of the Middle Kingdom. Throne bears traces of ancient carving error. The carver put signs the wrong way round on the left side of the throne and covered his mistake with plaster filling; cut 2 new signs over it facing in the correct direction. Plaster was mistakenly picked out once it was on display at museum, exposing error.

Statue Object On Display

Statue

Object Number:E12326
Place Name:Egypt, Memphis (Egypt)
Period:New Kingdom, Nineteenth Dynasty
Culture:

Description

Red granite Sphinx of Ramesses II, (19th Dynasty, circa 1293-1185 BCE). It was excavated from the sacred enclosure of the temple of the god Ptah at Memphis, Egypt. The sphinx, a lion with a human head, represents the power of the Egyptian king, both to protect his people and to conquer the enemies of Egypt. This statue was buried up to its shoulders; only the exposed head was attacked by windblown sand, which eroded the facial features and the royal false beard. The inscriptions on the chest and around the base give the five names of Ramesses II. His son and successor, Merenptah, added his own cartouches to the shoulders after his father's death. This sphinx, the third largest known in the world was quarried at Aswan and transported by river to the Ptah Temple at Memphis, 600 miles away. While it has never been placed on a scale, it is estimated to weigh over 14 tons.

Mummy Case Lid Object On Display

Mummy Case Lid

Object Number:E14344C
Place Name:Egypt, Thebes (uncertain) (Egypt)
Period:Third Intermediate Period, Twenty-First Dynasty
Culture:

Description

This anthropoid mummy case is made of cartonnage, a material consisting of several layers of linen or papyrus pasted together and covered by a thin layer of plaster and painted. The case originally contained the mummy of a man named Nebnetcheru, who was a priest with the title of God’s Father of Amun at Karnak Temple. Traces of gold on the face indicate that the deceased has been represented as a divine being with gold skin.
The entire coffin lid is covered with solar, funerary, and protective imagery. The gods Horus, Anubis, Osiris, Thoth, Isis, Nephthys, and Hathor in the form of a cow, among others, appear. In the area of the legs, there is a vertical column of text containing a request for offerings. The deceased’s name and title also appear in this location.
Some of the scenes are vignettes illustrating chapters of the Book of the Dead, a funerary text that often was included with grave goods. The main scene, on the chest, shows the deceased in a white linen garment being presented to Osiris, king of the underworld, by Horus and Thoth. Behind Osiris stand his sisters, Isis and Nephthys, and an underworld deity. Several protective amulets are represented in the lowermost register.
When acquired by the Museum in 1924, the case was intact and closed. It was opened in 1933 to remove the mummy (E14344A). The bottom is now separate (E14344B).

Necklace Object On Display

Necklace

Object Number:29-70-19
Place Name:Egypt, Mit-Rahineh
Period:Late Period, Twenty-Sixth Dynasty
Culture:

Description

String of 30 gold cowrie shell-shaped beads, one gold pomegranate shaped bead with granulation, and two large barrel-shaped beads, one gold and one chalcedony. Cast gold pendant of the goddess Sekhmet standing, with her hands at her sides.

Statuette

Statuette

Object Number:40-18-2
Place Name:Egypt
Period:Late Period
Culture:

Description

Bronze. Seated with Horus on her lap. One horn of headdress missing. Traces of inscription around base.

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1 - of 19 Records

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