Black Bodies in Propaganda: The Art of the War Poster

June 2, 2013 – March 2, 2014
Merle-Smith Galleries, 1st Floor

Keep Us Flying - Buy War Bonds

Our Colored Heroes

Propaganda is used to mobilize people in times of war. Black Bodies in Propaganda: The Art of the War Poster presents 33 posters, most targeting Africans and African-American civilians in times of war. These carefully designed works of art were aimed at mobilizing people of color in war efforts, even as they faced oppression and injustice in their homelands. Witness changing messages on race and politics through propaganda from the American Civil War to the African Independence movement in this innovative, world-premiere exhibition.

Read more: Black Bodies in Propaganda: The Art of the War Poster

 

MAYA 2012: Lords of Time

May 5, 2012 - January 13, 2013
MAYA 2012:Lords of Time leads visitors on a journey through the Maya’s time-ordered universe, expressed through their intricate calendar systems, and the power wielded by their divine kings, the astounding "lords of time."

Read more: MAYA 2012: Lords of Time

 

Battleground: War Rugs from Afghanistan

April 30 through July 31, 2011

The rug weavers of Afghanistan, long renowned for their artistry, depict on their rugs the world that they see. Like television news, their rugs “report” current events. Since the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan in 1979 and throughout more than three decades of international and civil war, Afghan weavers have borne witness to disaster by weaving unprecedented images of battle and weaponry into their rugs. Flowers have turned into bullets, landmines, and hand grenades.

Read more: Battleground: War Rugs from Afghanistan

 

What in the World

January 28, 2010 - July 14, 2013

Third Floor Video Theatre
What in the World is an interactive installation created by multi-disciplinary artist Pablo Helguera as part of the Philagrafika contemporary art festival.

Read more: What in the World

 

Excavating Ground Zero: Fragments from 9/11

August 20 through November 6, 2011

Excavating Ground ZeroIn the weeks, months, and years following the events of September 11, 2001, archaeologists and physical anthropologists excavated the site of the World Trade Center buildings in New York City. Recall where you were that morning while viewing excavated and recovered artifacts from Ground Zero in this small display organized in conjunction with The National September 11 Memorial Museum. For details about a pay-what-you-like day of related programming September 11, and an evening program October 12, read the press release.

3rd Floor Galleries


Read more: Excavating Ground Zero: Fragments from 9/11

 

Run! Super-Athletes of the Sierra Madre

March 31 through September 30, 2012
1st floor, Merle-Smith Galleries

Considered to be the world’s greatest long-distance runners, the Tarahumara people live within the dramatic canyons of the Sierra Madre in Chihuahua, Mexico.

Read more: Run! Super-Athletes of the Sierra Madre

 

Secrets of the Silk Road

February 18 - June 5, 2011

Secrets of the Silk Road explores the history of the vast desert landscape of the Tarim Basin, located in Western China, and the mystery of the peoples who lived there. Located at the crossroads between East and West, oasis towns within the Tarim Basin were key way stations for anyone traveling on the legendary Silk Road. Extraordinarily well-preserved human remains found at these sites reveal ancient people of unknown descent. Caucasian in appearance, these mummies challenge long-held beliefs about the history of the area, and early human migration. The material excavated suggests the area was active for thousands of years, with diverse languages, lifestyles, religions, and cultures present. This exhibition provides a chance to investigate this captivating material to begin to uncover some of the secrets of the Silk Road. Read the press release

Read more: Secrets of the Silk Road

 

Year of Water

Special Display
Through July 2011

Long before the Bible, the story of a "Great Flood" was written on clay tablets in ancient Mesopotamia, in what is now modern-day Iraq. Penn Museum features an exceptional collection of ancient Mesopotamian artifacts and some of the world's earliest literature on clay tablets in this two case display. The sustaining and destroying powers of water in the region that some have called the "cradle of civilization" is considered. The objects on display include what is perhaps the most famous of the Sumerian "Flood Tablets," featuring the story of King Ziusudra who builds a boat to save his family from a great flood. Trescher Entrance.

Read more: Year of Water

 

On the Silk Road: Tashkent

Special photography display in the Archives hallway

A collection of albumen prints from the early 1890s illustrating the manners and customs of the Kyrgyz people, and localities in the vicinity of Tashkent and Samarkand in Uzbekistan.  Photographed by Bolojinsky, the images were purchased in 1896 by a Penn Museum representative attending the coronation of Czar Nicholas II and the Czarina Alexandra.  These rare images offer a glimpse into a world now remote.

Read more: On the Silk Road: Tashkent

 

Ceramic Interactions: Steve Keister

March 23, 2010 - June 28, 2010

Commissioned through The Clay Studio, Philadelphia, and co-curated by Jody Clowes, Jo Lauria, John Perreault and Judith Tannenbaum, Ceramic Interactions is sited at three Philadelphia institutions (the Philadelphia Museum of Art, Eastern State Penitentiary and the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology). Ceramic Interactions involved the commissioning of new works (or, in the case of the Penn Museum, inclusion of an artist’s recent works), in response to a piece, collection, or space housed within each venue. The artists' work offers each institution—and its public—an expanded or new context for seeing, interpreting or experiencing their collections or the way they perceive their space.

Read more: Ceramic Interactions: Steve Keister

 

Fang! The Killing Tooth

Special Display

Fang! The Killing Tooth explores the biology of the “killing” canine and the history of the vampire myth. Through objects, video, and text, you will be able to compare fangs from a range of different animals, investigate stories of ancient blood-sucking beings, and even get a new perspective on your own killing teeth.

The display will include a video of Dr. Janet Monge, Acting Curator-in-Charge and Keeper of the Physical Anthropology Section, discussing physical and cultural aspects of blood and the evolution of the canine tooth as they relate to vampire mythology.

Read more: Fang! The Killing Tooth

 

Mummies of the Tarim Basin: Photographs by Jeffery Newbury

Jeffery Newbury's photographs of the Tarim Basin mummies define these ancient people for our age, and probably for all time.

Read more: Mummies of the Tarim Basin: Photographs by Jeffery Newbury

 

Himalaya: Land of the Snow Lion

Himalaya: Land of the Snow Lion was on display in our Merle-Smith gallery 01 November 2008 through 14 September 2009.

Read more: Himalaya: Land of the Snow Lion

 

In Citizen's Garb: Southern Plains Native Americans, 1889 - 1891

March 26 through June 20, 2010

The 1880's and 1890's were decades of tremendous upheaval for many native peoples in Texas.

Read more: In Citizen's Garb: Southern Plains Native Americans, 1889 - 1891

 

North America Gallery

The culture and cultural perspectives of four Native American peoples of the Southwest are the focus of this exhibition, which opened 20 May 1995. Specifically, it examines the sacred and cultural connection that the Hopi, Zuni, Navajo, and Apache have with their environment. It features an Apache tipi, a Navajo hooghan framework, an illuminated walk-in sky theater, and more than 300 objects from the Museum's extensive archaeological and ethnographic Southwest collections.

Read more: North America Gallery

 

His Golden Touch: The Gordion Drawings of Piet de Jong

His Golden Touch: The Gordion Drawings of Piet de Jong will be on display in our Merle-Smith gallery
26 September 2009 through 10 January 2010
.

Read more: His Golden Touch: The Gordion Drawings of Piet de Jong

 

Painted Metaphors: Pottery and Politics of the Ancient Maya

 Painted Metaphors: Pottery and Politics of the Ancient Maya will be open in our Dietrich gallery 05 April 2009 through 31 January 2010.

Read more: Painted Metaphors: Pottery and Politics of the Ancient Maya

 

Archaeologists & Travelers in Ottoman Lands

September 26, 2010 - June 26, 2011

In the late 1800s, the University of Pennsylvania began excavating the ancient city of Nippur, located in present-day Iraq.

Read more: Archaeologists & Travelers in Ottoman Lands

 

The Goodlands

December 10, 2009 -  May 14, 2010
"If you can imagine and see a community in a different way, you can create a community in a different way."
- Reverend Patrick Cabello Hansel, Founder of the Goodlands®

Read more: The Goodlands

 

Marilyn Bridges: The Sacred and the Secular

Marilyn Bridges: The Sacred and the Secular was on display in our Merle-Smith gallery 24 April 2009 through 21 June 2009

Read more: Marilyn Bridges: The Sacred and the Secular

 

Raven's Journey

Raven's Journey interprets the traditions of the Tlingit, Athapaskan, and Eskimo groups that have inhabited western North America for centuries.

Read more: Raven's Journey

 

Polynesian Gallery

Polynesia (from the Greek for “many islands”) is a series of islands and island groups widely scattered across the central and south Pacific Ocean. 

Read more: Polynesian Gallery

 
MUSEUM LOCATION

3260 South Street
Philadelphia, PA 19104
(215) 898-4000

MUSEUM HOURS

Tuesday-Sunday: 10:00am - 5:00pm
First Wednesdays: 10:00am - 8:00pm
Monday: CLOSED

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