Penn Museum’s Renowned Benin Bronzes from Nigeria Are Featured In a New Exhibition "IYARE! Splendor and Tension in Benin’s Palace Theatre"

07 OCTOBER 2008, PHILADELPHIA, PA—”Iyare!”—”May you go and return safely!”—is the phrase onlookers shout when Edo nobles head for the Benin Kingdom’s palace in the West African country of Nigeria.

A high-ranking military chief dominates this 16th century plaque, one of nearly a thousand that decorated Benin palace courtyards. Accompanied by an entourage of lieutenants, musicians and pages prepared to fan him, the chief dances at the palace war festival.The University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology invites visitors to a new exhibition that focuses on the rich art and cultural heritage, as well as the ongoing traditions, of the Edo people of Nigeria’s Benin Kingdom. IYARE! Splendor and Tension in Benin’s Palace Theatre opens with a public celebration Saturday, 08 November 2008.

Nearly 100 objects from the Penn Museum's world-renowned collection of cast bronzes, carved ivories and wooden artifacts (16th to the 21st centuries A.D.) from the Kingdom of Benin, form the core of this new exhibition. Photographs from contemporary palace life, text, video, regional Nigerian art, and international art inspired by Benin culture, help to tell the story. The exhibition includes many Penn Museum pieces that have not been on display for decades, as well as loans of significant works from the Smithsonian's National Museum of African Art, the Brooklyn Museum, and the Baltimore Museum of Art. IYARE! is an outgrowth of a University of Pennsylvania Halpern-Rogath History of Art curatorial seminar, and a curatorial collaboration between its students and African art historian and professor Dr. Kathy Curnow.

Read more: Penn Museum’s Renowned Benin Bronzes from Nigeria Are Featured In a New Exhibition "IYARE!...

 

Unique Reception at University of Pennsylvania Museum Welcomes International Students and Scholars to the Delaware Valley

07 OCTOBER 2008, PHILADELPHIA, PA—How do you say “welcome to Philadelphia”—in every language of the world? Every year, as many as 1,000 guests from 100 or more countries network and make friends at the annual International Students Reception at the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology.

International students, scholars and professionals new to the Delaware Valley are invited to attend, in their ethnic best, if they wish, this year’s annual welcoming reception Friday, 17 October from 5:00 to 7:00 p.m. The event is held in the majestic Chinese Rotunda at the Penn Museum, 3260 South Street on the University of Pennsylvania campus.

Read more: Unique Reception at University of Pennsylvania Museum Welcomes International Students and...

 

Experts Discuss Previous Periods of Rapid Climate Change and Implications for Our Warming Planet

Public forum, “Climate Crises in Human History,” will conclude two-day conference at the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology.

16 OCTOBER 2008, PHILADELPHIA, PA—For the first time in human history the Earth’s climate is changing—and we know about it in advance. The ancient Egyptians, the Maya, the Roman Empire and medieval Europeans—all of whom faced dramatic climate change—did not. Some adapted to changing conditions; some did not. What can we learn from their strategies—both the successful and the unsuccessful, as we face our own climate crisis?

Read more: Experts Discuss Previous Periods of Rapid Climate Change and Implications for Our Warming Planet

 

13th Annual Peach Around the World

PENN MUSEUM'S FREE HOLIDAY FAMILY CELEBRATION, SUNDAY, 07 DECEMBER 2008 FROM 1:00 TO 4:00 P.M.

Sharmin Farhana from Bangladesh, one of five presenters at Penn Museum's free Peace Around the World event, shares aspects of her native country's New Year celebration. Photo: Lauren Hansen-Flaschen.10 NOVEMBER 2009, PHILADELPHIA, PA—Grab your “Holiday Passport” and get into the spirit of the holiday season Sunday, December 7th, 1:00 to 4:00 p.m., when the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology celebrates its 13th annual FREE Peace Around the World family-oriented afternoon. Continuing with last year’s tradition, this year’s theme is “Holiday Passport to Cultures,” and all visitors receive Museum “passports” with itineraries to visit Penn Museum International Classroom speakers and learn about holiday traditions in countries around the world. The day also features international music, choir music by children and adults, exotic face painting, balloon art, international family crafts, free treats for children, and more!

This year's event is in honor of Elaine Garfinkel, who founded Peace Around the World at Penn Museum in 1995. Elaine was an active member of the Penn Museum women's community for fifteen years. Her kindess and compassion live on through this special event.

Read more: 13th Annual Peach Around the World

 

"Fulfilling a Prophecy" Co-Curator Abigail Seldin Awarded Rhodes Scholarship

21 NOVEMBER 2008, PHILADELPHIA, PACo-curator of Penn Museum's Fulfilling a Prophecy and a student at the University of Pennsylvania, Ms. Seldin has been awarded a 2009 Rhodes Scholarship.

Ms. Seldin is a senior in the Department of Anthropology of Penn’s School of Arts and Sciences.

Read more: "Fulfilling a Prophecy" Co-Curator Abigail Seldin Awarded Rhodes Scholarship

 

Change in Admission Price

08 DECEMBER 2009, PHILADELPHAI, PA—Effective beginning January 2009, the new admission donation requested for entrance at the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology will be as follows: $10 general admission; $7 senior citizens (65 and above); $6 for children 6 to 17 and full-time students with college ID; free for children 5 and younger, Penn Museum members and Penncard holders.

Read more: Change in Admission Price

 

Penn Museum Welcomes the Year of the Ox at the 28th Annual Chinese New Year Celebration

21 DECEMBER 2009, PHILADELPHIA, PA—Enter the New Year with the strength and determination of an Ox! The University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology announces the 28th annual Chinese New Year Celebration, the Year of the Ox, Saturday, 24 January 2009, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.! Music and dance performances, healing and martial arts demonstrations, games, workshops, children's activities and much more - topped off with the traditional Chinese Lion Dance grand finale - are all part of the spectacular day-long celebration, free with Museum admission donation ($10 general admission; $7 seniors and $6 students with ID; free for children under 6, Museum members and PENNcard holders).

Read more: Penn Museum Welcomes the Year of the Ox at the 28th Annual Chinese New Year Celebration

 

Public Celebration of Charles Darwin's 200th Birthday: Free Darwin Day and Evolution Teach-In

Darwin Day Celebration is a Highlight Event for Philadelphia’s YEAR OF EVOLUTION

Clockwise from top left: Darwin Day 200th Birthday Celebration Poster; Charles Darwin plays badminton his favorite pastime sport; a unique and varied selection of orchids will be on display; visitors enjoy a show and tell table of hominid fossil casts. 14 JANUARY 2009, PHILADELPHIA, PA— Charles Robert Darwin, the world-renowned author of On the Origin of Species—and the originator of the modern theory of evolution—has his 200th birthday in February, and the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology celebrates it in style, with the third annual free Darwin Day and Evolution Teach In Sunday, 15 February 2009 from 1:00 to 4:00 p.m.

The free afternoon program features short “teach in” talks in galleries by renowned experts, curator-led tours of Penn Museum’s National Science Foundation-funded evolution exhibition Surviving, The Body of Evidence, and a physical anthropologist’s “touchables” corner with casts of hominid skulls and other bones. An “Origins” scavenger hunt, a family program on dinosaurs, a game of Evolutionary Twister, an orchid display, and the opportunity to play some badminton, reputedly a favorite pastime of the evolutionary thinker, are also part of the afternoon. Darwin himself (or a reasonable likeness) promises to make an appearance to enjoy the festivities—and partake of the free birthday cake!

Read more: Public Celebration of Charles Darwin's 200th Birthday: Free Darwin Day and Evolution Teach-In

 

New Exibition Opening - Painted Metaphors: Pottery and Politics of the Ancient Maya

Penn Museum Explores Daily Life During Politically Tumultuous Times

Known as “The Chama Vase,” this vessel from the 8th century CE was found in a stone-lined tomb at the ancient Maya site of Chama (in modern day Guatemala) at the end of the 19th century. Height: 23.5 cm; diameter: 15 cm. (Penn Museum object number 38-14-1) Photo: Penn Museum. A world-renowned collection of ancient Maya painted pottery, excavated by the University of Pennsylvania Museum nearly a century ago and reinterpreted in light of recent research in the field, provides the centerpiece for Painted Metaphors: Pottery and Politics of the Ancient Maya, a new exhibition opening at the Penn Museum 05 April 2009. Painted Metaphors runs through 31 January 2010, before beginning a multi-city national tour.

Like so many pieces of the famous Chama pottery that conservators meticulously put back together at the Penn Museum, Painted Metaphors yields new clues to understanding everyday life—and changing politics—of the ancient Maya of Guatemala 1,300 years ago.

Read more: New Exibition Opening - Painted Metaphors: Pottery and Politics of the Ancient Maya

 

Penn Museum Offers Summer 2009 Day Camp

“ANTHROPOLOGISTS IN THE MAKING” FOR CHILDREN AGES 7 TO 13

10 FEBRUARY 2009, PHILADELPHIA, PA—For the summer of 2009, adventurous children ages 7 through 13 can experience a day camp that takes them through time and across continents at the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology on Penn’s campus in Philadelphia.

Read more: Penn Museum Offers Summer 2009 Day Camp

 

20th Annual Celebration of African Cultures Offers Music, Dance, Storytelling, Talks, Games and More at the University of Pennsylvania Museum

21 FEBRUARY 2009, PHILADELPHIA, PA—Music and dance of Africa, storytelling, arts and crafts, gallery tours, culture and cuisine—it all comes together at the 20th annual Celebration of African Cultures Saturday, February 21, 11:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. throughout the galleries of the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology. The event is FREE with Museum admission donation ($10 for adults; $7 for seniors, 65 and above; $6 for students and children 6-17; free for Museum members, children under 6, and PENNcard holders).

Read more: 20th Annual Celebration of African Cultures Offers Music, Dance, Storytelling, Talks, Games and...

 

WOW! Superhero Day at the Penn Museum

22 FEBRUARY 2009, PHILADELPHIA, PA—ZAP! ZOOM! POW! Superheroes, super villains, and their sidekicks have enjoyed an honored place in American comics and movies—as they have in cultures around the world. Watch out on Sunday, 22 March 2009 from 1:00 to 4:00 p.m., as superheroes, traveling through time and across continents, invade the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology on the Penn campus in an afternoon of super antics, super games—and super fun!

Super Hero Day It’s WOW! Superhero Day, free with Museum admission donation, featuring activities for all ages: heroic talks and programs, comic book drawing workshops, superhero-style storytelling, a heroic scavenger hunt and heroic gallery tours, a balloon maker, a superhero marketplace with games and comics, Superhero Twister, comic hero mask making, and opportunities to learn and play popular superhero games. All superheroes and super villains who attend in costume receive discount admission ($2 off adult; $1 off children and senior citizens)—and the chance to win super prizes throughout the afternoon!

WOW! Superhero Day at the Penn Museum is a featured event of a year-long celebration, POW: Comics, Animation, and Graphic Novels, running Fall 2008 through Spring 2009 at the University of Pennsylvania.

Superheroes are the focus of three short programs. Peter Struck, Associate Professor of Classical Studies, University of Pennsylvania, looks back in time at “Ancient Heroes and Superheroes” at 1:15 p.m. "Costumed Culture Warriors" is the title of a short program featuring movie clips by Andrew J. Douglas, Ph.D., Director of Education at the Bryn Mawr Film Institute, at 2:00 p.m. “The Physics of Superheroes, or Why Can’t We All Ignore the Laws of Nature?” an interactive program by Bill Berner, Penn Physics Demonstration Laboratory Coordinator, takes a scientific view of the possible and impossible feats performed by a range of well-known superheroes at 3:00 p.m.

Read more: WOW! Superhero Day at the Penn Museum

 

UPM Archaeologist Keith Devries Asserts that Enigmatic Ivory Statuette, Uncovered in Greece in 1939, May be part of the Throne of the Famed Kind Midas

03 JANUARY 2002, PHILADELPHIA, PA—It isn't made of gold, but a well-known and much-discussed ivory statuette of a lion-tamer, found in 1939 at Delphi, may very well be part of the throne given to the god Apollo by the famous King Midas of Phrygia.

So asserts Dr. Keith DeVries, Associate Curator, Mediterranean section of the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology, and former Field Director of the Museum's long-term excavation project at the Phrygian capital of Gordion in Turkey. Dr. DeVries shares his intriguing argument, based upon archaeological finds from Turkey and ancient written evidence, Saturday, January 5th at the 103rd annual meeting of the Archaeological Institute of America, held this year in Philadelphia.

Read more: UPM Archaeologist Keith Devries Asserts that Enigmatic Ivory Statuette, Uncovered in Greece in...

 

University of Pennsylvania Museum Excavations at Gordion, Turkey, Reveal Celtic Sacrifices

04 JANUARY 2002, PHILADELPHIA, PA—Discovery of grisly evidence of strangulation and decapitation, and bizarre arrangements of human and animal bones, has solved the longstanding mystery about the Celtic presence at Gordion, Turkey, where the University of Pennsyvlania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology has been excavating since 1950. The chronologically rich site, long renowned as the capital of Phrygia in the 8th century B.C. and the center from which the famed King Midas once ruled, is about 60 miles southwest of Ankara in central Turkey.

Read more: University of Pennsylvania Museum Excavations at Gordion, Turkey, Reveal Celtic Sacrifices

 

University of Pennsylvania Museum Awarded $302,000 from National Endowment for their Humanities for Pennsylvania Sumerian Dictionary Project

Project to Create World's First Dictionary of the First Written Language Gets Re-Defined in New Age of Internet Communications Technologies

02 APRIL 2002, PHILADELPHIA, PA—The University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology's Pennsylvania Sumerian Dictionary Project was awarded a two-year, $302,000 grant from the National Endowment of Humanities, an independent federal agency.

Read more: University of Pennsylvania Museum Awarded $302,000 from National Endowment for their Humanities...

 

Matriarchal, Islamic and Peace-builders: The Minangkabau of Indonesia Offer an Alternative Social System

Anthropologist Peggy Reeves Sanday Seeks to Redefine the Meaning of Matriarchy In Women at the Center, New Book Detailing Her Research among the Minangkabau

01 MAY 2002, PHILADELPHIA, PA—For the last century, historians, anthropologists and other scholars have searched both human history and the continents to find a matriarchy-a society where the power was in the hands of women, not men. Most have concluded that a genuine matriarchy does not exist, perhaps may never have existed.

Anthropologist Peggy Reeves Sanday disagrees. After years of research among the Minangkabau people of West Sumatra, Indonesia, she has accepted that group's own self-labeling, as a "matriarchate," or matriarchy. The problem, she asserts, lies in Western cultural notions of what a matriarchy "should" look like-patriarchy's female-twin.

Read more: Matriarchal, Islamic and Peace-builders: The Minangkabau of Indonesia Offer an Alternative Social...

 

Penn Museum Archaeologists Uncover 3700 Year Old "Magical" Birth Brick at Mayor's Residence Just Outside Abydos, Egypt

First Example Ever Found of These Special-Use Bricks, Known from Ancient Texts to be Used in Childbirth

01 JULY 2002, PHILADELPHIA, PA—University of Pennsylvania Museum archaeologists have discovered a 3700-year-old "magical" birth brick inside the palatial residence of a Middle Kingdom mayor's house just outside Abydos, in southern Egypt. The colorfully decorated mud birth brick-the first ever found-is one of a pair that would have been used to support a woman's feet while squatting during actual childbirth.

Read more: Penn Museum Archaeologists Uncover 3700 Year Old "Magical" Birth Brick at Mayor's Residence Just...

 

World-famous Etruscan Scholars Share Latest Research, Theories at International Symposium at University of Pennsylvania Museum

Symposium Offered in Celebration of "Worlds Intertwined: Etruscans, Greeks, and Romans," Permanent New Suite of Classical World Galleries

28 FEBRUARY 2003, PHILADELPHIA, PA—The Etruscan civilization, the preeminent culture of central Italy from 800-100 BC, has attracted a renaissance of interest among scholars and the public in recent years. From the Etruscan alphabet and the language, to the furnishings, architecture, fashion and city planning initiatives, these inventive pre-Roman people have left an enduring legacy. They shocked Greeks and Romans with the freedom of their women, their technological prowess, and their control of the sea—and then gradually lost it all to Rome's military campaigns. Yet, with little in the way of actual Etruscan texts preserved, the cultural artifacts that remain—strange, beautiful, sometimes seductive or frightening—pose challenges to archaeologists and historians eager to tease out a better understanding of the Etruscan contributions to the Roman culture that eventually subsumed them.

Read more: World-famous Etruscan Scholars Share Latest Research, Theories at International Symposium at...

 

University of Pennsylvania Museum to Conserve Seven Ancient Ceramic Coffins from Nippur, Iraq

Conservation Made Possible in Part with IMLS Matching Grant

01 JUNE 2003, PHILADELPHIA, PA—Seven ancient ceramic coffins from the southern Mesopotamian site of Nippur in present-day Iraq - all part of the University of Pennsylvania Museum's Nippur collection and the only such coffins in the United States - will receive the conservation they need, thanks in part to a prestigious matching grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS), a federal agency. The year-long conservation project will be carried out by independent conservator Julia Lawson with the advice and assistance of Virginia Greene, the Museum's Senior Conservator, and Dr. Richard Zettler, Penn Museum's Associate Curator in the Near East section.

Read more: University of Pennsylvania Museum to Conserve Seven Ancient Ceramic Coffins from Nippur, Iraq

 

Cache of Seal Impressions Discovered in Western India Offers Surprising New Evidence For Cultural Complexity in Little-known Ahar-banas Culture, Circa 3000-1500 B.C.

Find Provides New Insight into Widespread Trade, Cultural Exchange in Region

03 JUNE 2003, PHILADELPHIA, PA—Excavating at the ancient town of Gilund in southern Rajasthan, India, one of the largest sites of the little-known Ahar-Banas culture, archaeologists led by teams from the University of Pennsylvania Museum and Deccan College, Pune, India have discovered a bin filled with more than 100 seal impressions dating to 2100-1700 B.C. The existence of the seals, and their particular styles, offer surprising new evidence for the apparent complexity of this non-literate, late and post-Indus Civilization-era culture, according to Dr. Gregory Possehl, UPM curator and excavation co-director.

Read more: Cache of Seal Impressions Discovered in Western India Offers Surprising New Evidence For Cultural...

 
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