Penn Museum November-December 2011 Advance Calendar of Events

For the most updated information on programs offered at the Penn Museum, and for online pre-registration (optional or required for some programs) visit the Museum's website: www.penn.museum/calendar.

Puabi_BlackBkgrPMwebNovember 2
Wednesday, 10:30 am
Lecture Luncheon Program
Jewelry: Worn to Adorn
For thousands of years, jewelry has been used to express everything from status, to personal style, to readiness for marriage. In this, the first of a three-part lecture series presented by the Penn Museum's Women's Committee to benefit the Penn Museum, Dr. Jane Hickman speaks about jewelry and decorative metalwork of the ancient world from the Royal Tombs of Ur (a site in modern-day Iraq). Tickets to "Jewelry: Worn to Adorn": Aphrodite (Benefactor) $100; Diana (Friend) $85. Price includes lecture and luncheon, free verbal jewelry appraisals, jewelry shopping, a raffle auction, and complimentary valet parking at the Trescher entrance. For more information about the full series or to register, call 215.898.9202, or email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. .

PennCHClogo-color2-300pxNovember 2
Wednesday, 12:30 pm
Cultural Heritage Center Lecture
Underwater Cultural Heritage: The 2001 UNESCO Convention and its Implementation
Mariano Aznar, Chair of Public International Law at the University Jaume I in Spain, discusses the ways in which nations can protect their underwater heritage and keep treasure hunters away from shipwrecks. Dr. Aznar is one of the leaders in the implementation of the 2001 UNESCO Convention on underwater cultural heritage. An open discussion will follow a short presentation. Brownbag lecture-bring a lunch! Free; please email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. to register.

NoahsArk1PMwebNovember 2
Wednesday, 6:00 pm
Great Riddles in Archaeology Lecture Series
Noah's Ark
Of all the stories in the Bible, perhaps the best known is that of Noah's ark and the world-engulfing flood. Modern scholars have noted the story's resemblance to the Babylonian Epic of Gilgamesh. While believers and adventurers try to find proof of the ark itself on Turkey's Mt. Ararat, scientists instead look for evidence of the localized flood that inspired the stories. Dr. Fredrik Hiebert, National Geographic Explorer, was part of a team that discovered evidence of man-made structures 300 feet below the surface of the Black Sea, adding credence to theories that this was the location of the flood that inspired the biblical and Babylonian stories. Dr. Hiebert discusses his discoveries and other modern evidence helping to shed light on the mystery of Noah's ark. Admission: $10 at the door; $5 with advance registration; free for Penn Museum members with advance registration.

BigSmallPMwebNovember 6
Sunday, 1:00 to 4:00 pm
World Culture Day
Travel the World with Games
Penn is celebrating the Year of Games, and the Penn Museum joins in the action, inviting visitors to an afternoon where they can learn and play games from all over the world. Mancala, Chess, Go, Senet, and other games are highlighted by way of the Penn Museum's galleries. For a grand finale, the "Super Domino Brothers" Mike and Steve Perrucci set up and set off a sprawling 10,000-piece domino run. Free with Museum admission.

reelinjun_1PMwebNovember 6
Sunday, 2:00 pm
Culture Change, Adaptation, and Image Film Series
Reel Injun
Cree filmmaker Neil Diamond takes a look at the Hollywood Indian, exploring the portrayal of North American Natives throughout a century of cinema. Traveling through the heartland of America and into the Canadian North, Diamond looks at how the myth of "the Injun" has influenced the world's understanding-and misunderstanding-of native peoples. Reel Injun traces the evolution of cinema's depiction of Native people from the silent film era to today, with clips from hundreds of classic and recent Hollywood movies, and candid interviews with celebrated Native and non-Native film celebrities, activists, film critics, and historians. John Sanchez, Penn State Professor, and Visiting Professor, University of Pennsylvania Anthropology Department and the Annenberg School, introduces the film. The program is presented with support from Penn's Anthropology Department and the Greenfield Intercultural Center in conjunction with the Penn Humanities Forum. Free with Museum admission.

November 9
Wednesday, 5:00 to 8:00 pm
P.M. @ Penn Museum
2nd Wednesday Quizzo
Penn Museum galleries stay open until 8:00 pm, with a half-hour gallery tour at 5:30 pm. Second Wednesdays only, guests can watch or sign up with a team and compete for prizes at Quizzo with Quiztine at 6:00 pm. The Pepper Mill Café offers happy hour specials and light supper until 7:30 pm. The Museum Shop remains open until 8:00 pm. Free with Museum admission.

mortonskullsPMwebNovember 9
Wednesday, 6:00 pm
Evening Lecture
The Morton Collection at the Penn Museum
Dr. Janet Monge, Curator of Human Evolution: The First 200 Million Years, and Associate Curator of the Museum's Physical Anthropology Section, offers an introduction to a famous-and famously controversial-collection of human skulls housed in the Penn Museum. The Morton Collection, amassed more than 150 years ago, still remains at the center of discussion about human races and the nature of bias in science. Admission: Pay-what-you-want.

November 12
Saturday, 3:30 pm
Afternoon Lecture
"Writing History from Very Special Garbage: Research in the Cairo Geniza in the 21st Century"
Dr. Jessica Goldberg, New York University, speaks at this program sponsored by the Pennsylvania Chapter of the American Research Center in Egypt (ARCE-PA). In the 1890s, more than 300,000 manuscript leaves of paper were removed from a storeroom in the Ben Ezra synagogue of Old Cairo that had served for 900 years as its geniza; the materials were bought by or donated to dozens of collectors, universities, and libraries. In this talk, the story of these papers, their dispersal and the century of scholarship that followed, is examined. How has this dispersal shaped the way these documents have been used in historical scholarship? Dr. Goldberg also looks at the ways Geniza scholarship is currently being transformed by new efforts at cataloguing, imaging, and digitization, and the challenges and riches that lie ahead. $5 general admission; $3 Penn Museum members; free for ARCE-PA members.

UrLyrePMwebNovember 13
Sunday, 1:00 to 4:00 pm
Family Second Sunday
Beastly Bulls
Families of all ages are invited to join this drop-in program, be inspired by the world-famous lyre in Iraq's Ancient Past: Rediscovering Ur's Royal Cemetery, and work together to make bull-headed headbands to wear. Visitors can learn about bull symbolism of the world's ancient cultures. (Kids can join the Art Excavators Club by completing a craft at a Family Second Sunday program to receive a membership card. After attending three Family Second Sunday programs, kids will receive a free surprise.) Free with Museum admission.

Jerusalem1PMwebNovember 13
Sunday, 1:00 to 3:30 pm
Travel the World in a Day
Jerusalem: The Holy City
Guests to the Penn Museum's new Travel the World in a Day series have the opportunity to take an armchair tour of distinctive locales as seen through the ages-no passport required. This fall, the focus is on Jerusalem, a holy city to three religions: Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. A panel of speakers explores different time periods in this incredible city's history, including Jerusalem in the time of Jesus, Medieval Jerusalem, and contemporary Jerusalem. Admission: $20; $15 Penn Museum members; free with PennCard.

November 16
Wednesday, 6:00 pm
P.M. @ Penn Museum
Secret Cinema: Charlie Chan in Egypt (1935)
Swedish-born actor Warner Oland stars in this evocative early entry in the long-lived Charlie Chan series, which finds the proverb-quoting Chinese sleuth travelling to Cairo (via airplane and mule). There he investigates missing ancient treasures and a murdered archaeologist whose body is discovered inside a sarcophagus. The film effectively combines mystery and horror genre elements, and its plot about stolen antiquities landing in European museums touches on the then little-discussed subject of museum ethics. Conversely, the film is rich in dated depictions of race, most strikingly so in the character of Chan's slow-paced comic sidekick, played by notorious black character actor Stepin Fetchit. Film historian William K. Everson wrote that Charlie Chan in Egypt was "easily the best" in the Chan series: "Effective use of background music, good set design, and superb camerawork created some genuinely nightmarish sequences which are still chilling today." Free with Museum admission.

40winks_logo_smallNovember 18
Friday, 6:30 pm - Saturday, 9:00 am
Sleepover Program
40 Winks with the Sphinx
Penn Museum's sleepover program, geared to children ages 6 to 12 and their families or chaperones, invites guests on an overnight "expedition" of the Museum. The night's activities take intrepid explorers on a journey through time and across continents, with hands-on games, crafts, and more! A scavenger hunt and a flashlight expedition through the galleries offer new ways to connect with the ancient artifacts awaiting discovery. Later in the night, explorers roll out their sleeping bags to doze at the foot of the third largest granite Sphinx outside Egypt! Admission: $45 Penn Museum Members; $50 General Admission. Information: www.penn.museum/40winks

ClimateCrises_PMwebNovember 19
Saturday, 3:00 to 5:00 pm
Afternoon Program
Climate Crises in Human History
Penn Museum presents an afternoon celebration of-and debate about-a hot topic and an important new book. In 2008, the Penn Museum hosted international scholars for a two-day conference on climate change in human history. Papers gathered post-conference and edited by Claudio Vita Finzi, Robert Giegengack, and A. Bruce Mainwaring were published as an American Philosophical Society book, Climate Crises in Human History. Scholars, including Professor Graeme Barker, Disney Professor of Archaeology at the University of Cambridge, Professor Joseph Farrell from Penn's Department of Classical Studies, and Professor Robert Giegengack from Penn's Department of Geology, come together to debate the topical and thought-provoking issues raised in this book. Admission: Pay-what-you-want.

ImagineAfricaLatest_pmwebNovember 30
Wednesday, 6:00 pm
Imagine Africa Lecture Series
2001-2011: Celebrating Ten Years of Penn in Botswana
This year marks ten years of Penn working to improve the health of people in Botswana. Much has changed in Botswana since President Festus Mogae warned in 2001, "We are threatened with extinction. People are dying in chillingly high numbers." The HIV/AIDS death rate in Botswana-once one of the highest in the world-has dropped significantly since that dire proclamation. Harvey Friedman, MD, Director of the Botswana-UPenn Partnership, talks about Penn's role in treating HIV/AIDS in Botswana, new challenges to health in the region, and what we are learning about new ways to treat patients and populations in Botswana. Admission: Pay-what-you-want.

PennCHClogo-color2-300pxDecember 1
Thursday, 4:30 pm
Cultural Heritage Center Lecture
The Lure of the Relic: Collecting and Consuming Artifacts from the Holy Land
The relationship between people and objects is a crucial avenue of investigation in understanding past cultures. Employing case studies from Jordan, Israel, and the Palestinian Authority, Dr. Morag Kersel, DePaul University, examines the appeal of relics from the Holy Land, as well as the collection of archaeological materials, the effects on the archaeological landscape, and the object biographies of those artifacts enmeshed in the antiquities trade. Free.

40winks_kids_smallDecember 2
Friday, 6:30 pm - Saturday, 9:00 am
Sleepover Program
40 Winks with the Sphinx
Penn Museum's sleepover program, geared to children ages 6 to 12 and their families or chaperones, invites guests on an overnight "expedition" of the Museum. The night's activities take intrepid explorers on a journey through time and across continents, with hands-on games, crafts, and more! A scavenger hunt and a flashlight expedition through the galleries offer new ways to connect with the ancient artifacts awaiting discovery. Later in the night, explorers roll out their sleeping bags to doze at the foot of the third largest granite Sphinx outside Egypt! Admission: $45 Penn Museum Members; $50 General Admission. Information: www.penn.museum/40winks

BetsyBrianPMwebDecember 3
Saturday, 3:30 pm
Afternoon Lecture
Recent Excavations at the Temple of the Goddess Mut in Luxor
Dr. Betsy Brian, Johns Hopkins University, speaks at this program, sponsored by the Pennsylvania Chapter of the American Research Center in Egypt (ARCE-PA). $5 general admission; $3 Penn Museum members; free for ARCE-PA members.

December 4
Sunday, 1:00 to 4:00 pm
World Culture Day
Annual Peace around the World: Passport to Cultures
Penn Museum celebrates the holiday season, around the world, with its 16th annual Peace around the World family-oriented afternoon. Visitors receive a "Passport to Cultures" with an itinerary to visit galleries where International Classroom speakers share holiday traditions of their home countries through music, stories, arts, crafts, games, and more. The afternoon also features music and dancing, exotic face painting, balloon art, family crafts, and free treats for children, all with an international focus. Guests can learn about the Penn Museum's "Adopt an Artifact" program with a special activity for the family to enjoy. Free with Museum admission.

December 4
Sunday, 2:00 pm
Culture Change, Adaptation, and Image Film Series
"Pushy Women" 2001
This short film by director Caro MacDonald offers a glimpse of life for Japanese women in a quite atypical profession-sumo wrestling. Dr. Ayako Kano, University of Pennsylvania East Asian Studies, discusses the film. The Center for East Asian Studies, University of Pennsylvania, sponsors the program in conjunction with the Penn Humanities Forum. Free with Museum admission.

Stonehenge1PMwebDecember 7
Wednesday, 6:00 pm
Great Riddles in Archaeology Lecture Series
Merlin's Magic Circles: Stonehenge and the Use of the Preseli Bluestones

Known the world over as an iconic symbol of Europe's prehistoric past, Stonehenge has a truly exceptional history. Combining archeological evidence, oral tradition, and folklore, Professor Timothy Darvill of Bournemouth University, UK, traces Stonehenge's transformation from a conventional ceremonial structure to a destination for prehistoric pilgrims seeking its magical healing properties. Admission: $10 at the door; $5 with advance registration; free for Penn Museum members with advance registration.

ImagineAfricaLatest_pmwebDecember 11
Sunday, 1:00 to 4:00 pm
Family Second Sunday
Crazy Creatures
Families of all ages are invited to drop in and learn more about evolution. Visitors will be able to create a flipbook featuring their favorite animals, as well as learn about some real animal adaptations, explore their family's heredity, and discover other aspects of evolution. (Kids can join the Art Excavators Club by completing a craft at a Family Second Sunday program to receive a membership card. After attending three Family Second Sunday programs, kids will receive a free surprise.) Free with Museum admission.

QuizzoPMwebDecember 14
Wednesday, 6:00 pm
P.M. @ Penn Museum
2nd Wednesday Quizzo
Penn Museum galleries stay open until 8:00 pm, with a half-hour gallery tour at 5:30 pm. Second Wednesdays only, guests can watch or sign up with a team and compete for prizes at Quizzo with Quiztine at 6:00 pm. The Pepper Mill Café offers happy hour specials and light supper until 7:30 pm. The Museum Shop remains open until 8:00 pm. Free with Museum admission.

The University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology is dedicated to the study and understanding of human history and diversity. Founded in 1887, the Museum has sent more than 400 archaeological and anthropological expeditions to all the inhabited continents of the world. With an active exhibition schedule and educational programming for children and adults, the Museum offers the public an opportunity to share in the ongoing discovery of humankind's collective heritage.

Penn Museum is located at 3260 South Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (on Penn's campus, across from Franklin Field). Public transportation to the Museum is available via SEPTA's Regional Rail Line at University City Station; the Market-Frankford Subway Line at 34th Street Station; trolley routes 11, 13, 34, and 36; and bus routes 12, 21, 30, 40, and 42. Museum hours are Tuesday and Thursday through Sunday, 10:00 am to 5:00 pm, and Wednesday, 10:00 am to 8:00 pm, with P.M. @ PENN MUSEUM evening programs offered weekly. Closed Mondays and holidays. Admission is $10 for adults; $7 for senior citizens (65 and above); $6 children (6 to 17) and full-time students with ID; free to Members, PennCard holders, and children 5 and younger; "pay-what-you-want" the last hour before closing. Penn Museum can be found on the web at www.penn.museum. For general information call 215.898.4000. For group tour information call 215.746.8183.

Photo captions (listed top to bottom): Queen Puabi's Headdress, beaded cape and jewelry (includes comb, hair rings, wreaths, hair ribbons, and earrings) of gold, lapis lazuli and carnelian, from the Royal Cemetary of Ur, ca 2550 BCE; Image Credit: Penn Museum. Noah's Ark. Mike and Steve Perrucci Photo: Mike Perrucci. Movie Still from Reel Injun Credit: Neil Diamond, Lorber Films, Copyright 2010. Morton Skull Collection Photo: Steven Minicola. Front view of the bull-headed Great Lyre from the "King's Grave" at Ur. Gold, silver, lapis lazuli, shell, bitumen, and wood. (35.6 cm height of head, 33 cm height of plaque) ca. 2650-2550 BC. Jerusalem. Climate Crises in Human History by A. Bruce Mainwaring; Robert Francis Geigengack; Claudio Vita-Finzi. Philadelphia: American Philosophical Society, 2010. Excavations at Temple of Mut, image courtesy ARCE-PA. Stonehenge. Quizzo players at Penn Museum.

MUSEUM LOCATION

3260 South Street
Philadelphia, PA 19104
(215) 898-4000

MUSEUM HOURS

Tuesday-Sunday: 10:00am - 5:00pm
First Wednesdays: 10:00am - 8:00pm
Monday: CLOSED

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