September/October 2009 Calendar of Events at the Penn Museum

For the most updated information on programs offered at the Penn Museum, and for on-line pre-registration (optional or required for some programs) visit our online calendar: www.penn.museum/calendar

Yoga instructor Lauren Brown strikes a pose09 September through 28 October 2009
Wednesdays, 5:30pm to 7pm
Vinyasa Yoga in the Galleries
Lauren Brown, certified yoga instructor, offers yoga sessions in the beautiful setting of the Penn Museum’s atmospheric galleries.  This weekly Wednesday evening class, designed to accommodate all levels of ability, focuses on basic yoga positions for building strength and increasing endurance.  Beginners are welcome.  Attendees should bring a yoga mat and towel, and wear comfortable clothing.  Class size is limited.  $12 per class.  Information:  (215) 898-4890.

Abydos Book Jacket19 September 2009
Saturday, 9:30am to 6:30pm
Public Symposium
Ancient Abydos:  From Egypt's First Pharaohs to its Last Pyramid
The sacred city of Abydos served as the primary cult center of the Egyptian god Osiris, ruler of the underworld.  The immense religious importance of this site is evident in its rich archaeological remains, which cover all phases of ancient Egyptian civilization.  Since 1967, the University of Pennsylvania–Yale–IFA Expedition to Abydos has investigated the complex history and development at the site.  Symposium speakers include Dr. David O'Connor (Co-Director, Penn-Yale-IFA Expedition to Abydos), Dr. Matthew Adams (Shunet el-Zebib, North Abydos), Dr. Janet Richards (Abydos Middle Cemetery Project), Dr. Josef Wegner (Senwosret III Mortuary Complex, South Abydos Project), and Dr. Stephen Harvey (Ahmose and Tetisheri Project). The symposium is sponsored by the American Research Center in Egypt, Pennsylvania Chapter (ARCE-PA); the Center for Ancient Studies; the Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations; and the Penn Museum.  Advance registration:  $15 General Admission, $5 Museum members, and free for ARCE-PA members and PennCard holders.  At-the-door registration:  $20 General Admission, $10 Museum members, $5 for ARCE- PA members and Penncard holders.

Spend a night at the Penn Museum!25 - 26 September 2009
Friday, 6:30pm to Saturday, 9am
Sleepover Program
40 Winks with the Sphinx
Penn Museum’s new sleepover program, geared to ages 6 to 12 and their families or chaperones, invites guests to an overnight “expedition” of the Museum.   The night’s activities are geared to take intrepid explorers on a journey through time and across continents, with hands-on opportunities through games, crafts, and more!  A scavenger hunt and an evening expedition through the galleries by flashlight offer new ways to connect with the ancient artifacts awaiting discovery.   Later in the night, explorers roll out their sleeping bags—to doze at the foot of the third largest granite Sphinx in the world!  Advance reservations: www.penn.museum/sleepovers.  $50, $45 Museum members. Information: (215) 898-4890.

26 September 2009
Saturday, 1pm to 4pm
World Culture Day
Turkish Delight!
Visitors are invited to an afternoon of pure Turkish Delight! as the Museum celebrates the opening of His Golden Touch: The Gordion Drawings of Piet de Jong with a wider look at the culture of Turkey.  The afternoon features Turkish dancing and music, plus an authentic cuisine demonstration, talks on ancient and modern Turkey, crafts, and more.  Sponsored by the Turkish American Friendship Society of the United States, the Middle East Center of the University of Pennsylvania, and the Education Department’s International Classroom program at the Penn Museum  Free with Museum admission donation.

30 September 2009
Wednesday, 6pm
Evening Lecture
There Goes the Neighborhood: A Muslim Castle in an Age of Crusades What did medieval holy war feel like? How did it affect daily life, and not just politics? Dr. Paul M. Cobb, Associate Professor of Islamic History in the Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations at Penn and a Consulting Curator at the Penn Museum, explores how one medieval Muslim family responded to the crusades (1099-1291 CE) and adapted to the changing currents of their day from the vantage point of their family castle in northern Syria. Free. Pre-registration required.

Dr. David Silverman 07 October 2009
Wednesday, 6pm
Great Archaeological Discoveries of the World
Everywhere the Glint of Gold: The Discovery of the Tomb of Tutankhamun
From the intact tomb of an Egyptian pharaoh to the enigmatic ancient sculptures of Easter Island, some of the world’s greatest archaeological discoveries are featured at the Penn Museum’s new monthly lecture series, offered the first Wednesday of every month, October 2009 through June 2010.  The program begins with Everywhere the Glint of Gold: The Discovery of the Tomb of Tutankhamun.  Dr. David Silverman, Eckley B. Coxe Curator of Penn's Egyptian section and curator of the recent international blockbuster Tutankhamun and the Golden Age of the Pharaohs, relates the story of the long search for the tomb of the boy-king Tutankhamun by the determined British archaeologist Howard Carter, whose excavations resulted ultimately in the discovery of a treasure beyond his—and the world’s—wildest dreams. $35 for full lecture series subscription in advance, or $5 per lecture. Free for Museum Members.


Uncorking the Past Book Jacket08 October 2009
Thursday, 6pm
Lecture, Book Signing and Tasting
Uncorking the Past
Cheers!  Dr. Patrick E. McGovern, Research Project Manager, Near East Section, Penn Museum, and a leading authority on ancient alcoholic beverages, offers an update on what we now know about how humans created and enjoyed fermented beverages throughout time and across cultures.  A book signing of his newest title, Uncorking the Past: The Quest for Wine, Beer, and Other Alcoholic Beverages  (Berkeley: University of California Press, 2009)— the story of humanity’s ingenious, oft-times intoxicating quest for the perfect drink— follows at a reception where guests are invited to taste some of the ancient-inspired brews of Dogfish Head Brewery, wines of the Near East and the Americas, and additional historically-inspired beverages  from the Dock Street Brewery, Williams Brothers, and others.  $60; $45 Museum members.

VIew of pyramids from the South10 October 2009
Saturday, 1pm to 4pm
Afternoon Workshop
Ancient Egyptian Pyramids 101
The Great Pyramid at Giza, one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World, remains an iconic image of ancient Egypt—yet pyramids were built as royal tombs at a range of sites in Egypt, from the Old Kingdom (2686-2160 BCE) to the beginning of the New Kingdom (1550-1069 BCE).   The origins and development, construction and symbolism of these amazing constructions are the focus of this afternoon workshop, presented by Leslie Anne Warden, PhD candidate in the department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations.  Sponsored by the American Research Center in Egypt, Philadelphia Chapter (ARCE-PA).  $15 General Admission, $10 Museum members, and free to ARCE-PA members.

Italian Village13 October 2009
Tuesday, 6pm
Director’s Lecture
Origins of Italian Hilltop Villages
Dr. Richard Hodges, Williams Director, the Penn Museum, offers this lecture, a review of the latest evidence for the transformation of the Roman countryside and the making of Italy’s distinctive hilltop towns. He examines the controversial history of research as well as on-going projects in the Italian regions of Molise and Tuscany.  Free. Pre-registration recommended.

17 October 2009
Saturday, 9am to 5pm
Day-long Event
Globalization in Progress: World Urbanization and its Consequences
What does globalization mean for us? What new opportunities or risks should we look out for? For the first time in human history, more than half of the world's population lives in cities, one in three of those people in poverty. As population density has increased, individuals have grown accustomed, as never before, to expect difference and innovation--expectations that actually accelerate the rate of change. Scholars from a number of disciplines around the University of Pennsylvania, working on issues arising from accelerating change in the modern world, come together to consider globalization in a rapidly urbanizing world through a series of short, interactive sessions with talks, images and video, Q & A and discussion. Attendees hear from program organizer and Museum anthropologist Brian Spooner, Near East section Associate Curator Richard Zettler, and Acting Physical Anthropology Curator Janet Monge, as well as Lee Cassanelli (Director of the African Studies Center, and Department of History, School of Arts and Sciences), Mauro Guillen (Director of the Lauder Institute of Management and International Studies, and Professor, Wharton School of Business), Alan Ruby (School of Education), and other contributors from the School of Veterinary Medicine, the School of Nursing, Global Health Programs and others, on topics ranging from World Food Production and Nutrition to Finance and the Growth of Cities. The program is co-sponsored by the Penn Insstitute for Urban Research, the department of Anthropology at Penn, and the Penn Museum.  Free. Pre-registration recommended.

Ram in the Thicket23 October 2009
Friday, 6pm
Gala Evening
The Golden Age of Archaeology: Secrets Beneath the Sand
The period of the 1920s and 1930s brought to light some of the most important and magnificent archaeological discoveries ever made, capturing the interest of people all over the world.  Join the Women’s Committee of the Penn Museum in celebrating some of the most remarkable discoveries of this era, as revisited through extraordinary ancient artifacts from the Penn Museum’s world-renowned collection.   Be the first to view the new installation of Discovering Iraq’s Ancient Past: Reinvestigating Ur’s Royal Cemetery.  For more information and to request a gala invitation, call (215) 898-9202.

25 October 2009
Sunday, 1:30pm to 4pm
Exhibition Opening Celebration
Discovering Iraq’s Ancient Past: Reinvestigating Ur’s Royal Cemetery
The Museum celebrates the opening of Discovering Iraq’s Ancient Past with an afternoon of dance, music, lectures, crafts and more.  Free with Museum admission donation.

29 October 2009
Thursday, 6pm
Kenneth J. Matthews Annual Lecture
The Archaeology of Qumran and the Dead Sea Scrolls 
In the mid-1940s, a Bedouin boy discovered the first Dead Sea Scrolls in a cave near the site of Qumran, in Israel’s West Bank by the shore of the Dead Sea. Eventually over 900 scrolls dating to the late Second Temple period (approximately the time of Jesus) were discovered in 11 caves around Qumran. Dr. Jodi Magness, the Kenan Distinguished Professor for Teaching Excellence in Early Judaism at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and author of The Archaeology of Qumran and the Dead Sea Scrolls, discusses the significance of the Dead Sea Scrolls, which were deposited in the caves by members of a Jewish sect that lived at Qumran.  Reception with book signing and cash bar follows.  Free.  Information: (215) 898-4890.


30 -31 October 2009
Friday, 6:30pm to Saturday, 9am
Halloween Sleepover
40 Winks with the Sphinx
Boo!  Special spooks and ghouls join the fun at this Halloween sleepover adventure.  The night’s activities are geared to take intrepid explorers, ages 6 to 12, and their families or chaperones, on a journey through time and across continents, with hands-on opportunities through games, crafts, and more!  A scavenger hunt and an evening expedition through the galleries by flashlight offer new ways to connect with the ancient artifacts awaiting discovery.   Later in the night, explorers roll out their sleeping bags—to doze at the foot of the third largest granite Sphinx in the world!  Advance reservations: www.penn.museum/sleepovers.  $50, $45 Museum members. Information: (215) 898-4890.


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The University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology is dedicated to the study and understanding of human history and diversity.  Founded in 1887, the Museum has sent more than 400 archaeological and anthropological expeditions to all the inhabited continents of the world.  With an active exhibition schedule and educational programming for children and adults, the Museum offers the public an opportunity to share in the ongoing discovery of humankind’s collective heritage.

Penn Museum is located at 3260 South Street  (on Penn’s campus, across from Franklin Field), Philadelphia, PA 19104.  Museum hours are Tuesday through Saturday, 10am to 4:30pm; Sunday 1pm to 5pm;  Closed Mondays and holidays.  Admission donation is $10 for adults; $7 for senior citizens (65 and above); $6 children 6 to 17 and full-time students with ID; free to Members, Penncard holders, and children five and younger.  Everyday after 3:30pm the admission donation is whatever you feel like offering.  Penn Museum can be found on the web at www.penn.mueum. For general information call (215) 898-4000.   

Photographs, additional information available upon request.


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