Mongolian Ambassador, International Mongolia Experts, Come Together for Free Afternoon Program Thursday, May 10 at Penn Museum: “From Genghis Khan and the Mongol Empire to Mongolia’s Place in the World Today”

02 MAY 2007, PHILADELPHIA, PA—Mongolian Ambassador to the United States Ravdan Bold, and Mongolia’s former Ambassador to the United Nations Dr. J. Enksaikhan, will be among several speakers at a free public forum, From Genghis Khan and the Mongol Empire to Mongolia’s Place in the World Today, Thursday, 10 May 2007 from 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. in the Rainey Auditorium at the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology, 3260 South Street in Philadelphia.



The program features Mongolian experts from several disciplines:

Prof. Christopher Atwood, Indiana University
Genghis Khan’s Mongol Empire

Prof. David Sneath, Cambridge University
Mongolia’s Herders: From Collectivization to Pastoral Nomads

Dr. J. Enkhsaikhan, Director of Blue Banner (Non-government Organization, Mongolia) and former Ambassador to the United Nations
Mongolia Today: Current Connections and Concerns

Ambassador Ravdan Bold, Mongolian Ambassador to the United States
Mongolia’s Economy and International Relations (Questions from the audience)

With an introduction by Penn Museum’s Dr. Paula Sabloff, Senior Research Scientist, and Dr. Fredrik Hiebert, Research Associate.

This public afternoon program marks the conclusion of a three day, multi-disciplinary international research conference, “Mapping Mongolia,” open to invited scholars only. At the research conference, scholars will be considering Mongolia’s place among nations; is Mongolia, with its nomadic heritage and various relationships with China, the former Soviet bloc countries, Korea and even Japan, part of East Asia, Inner Asia, or Central Asia?

“Questions about how we ‘map’ Mongolia have important implications for both the academic community and the State Department. The idea of area studies developed in response to the Cold War, but organizing the world nations along those lines may not be relevant to our world any more,” noted Dr. Paula Sabloff, editor of Modern Mongolia, Reclaiming Genghis Khan, and co-organizer, with Dr. Fredrik Hiebert, of the scholarly conference.

The University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology, located at 3260 South Streets on the Penn campus in Philadelphia, is dedicated to the study and understanding of human history and diversity. Founded in 1887, the Museum has sent more than 400 archaeological and anthropological expeditions to all the inhabited continents of the world. With an active exhibition schedule and educational programming for children and adults, the Museum offers the public an opportunity to share in the ongoing discovery of humankind's collective heritage. For general information, visitors may call (215) 898-4000, or visit the Museum’s award-winning website at http://www.penn.museum.


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