Penn Museum January/February 2013 Calendar of Events

For the most updated information on programs offered at the Penn Museum, and for online pre-registration (optional or required for some programs) visit the Museum's website: www.penn.museum/calendar.

GettysburgJanuary 2
Wednesday, 6:00 pm
"Great Battles" Evening Lecture
Gettysburg: History and Hype
It is conventional to depict Gettysburg as a decisive Union victory, the turning point in our Civil War. But that conflict dragged on for nearly two years after Gettysburg, and the fierce resistance mounted by Confederate armies in Virginia and Georgia in the spring and summer of 1864 almost caused a war-weary Northern public to lose its will to continue fighting and turn Abraham Lincoln out of the White House. This lecture compares this battle with other truly decisive Union victories, and considers today's distorted view of what the Civil War was really like—which blinds people to the kind of nation that the war produced. Dr. Gregory J.W. Urwin, Department of History, Temple University, speaks at this "Great Battles: Moments in Time that Changed History" series lecture program. Admission with advance registration: $5; $10 at the door based on availability. To register, visit www.penn.museum/greatbattles. For more information, call 215.898.2680.

January 9
Wednesday, 6:00 pm
P.M. @ Penn Museum
2nd Wednesday Quizzo
Trivia buffs can test their knowledge and compete for prizes at Quizzo. The Pepper Mill Café, where the game is on, offers happy hour specials and appetizers until 7:30 pm. For more information, call 215.898.2680.

January 9 – February 27
Wednesdays, 6:30 - 8:00 pm
Evening Program
Instructional Drum Circle
Guests are invited to come out and drum with Joseph Tayoun, internationally acclaimed Middle Eastern percussionist. These weekly sessions include instruction of rhythms, technique, and a drum circle jam in the Museum's Egyptian galleries. A limited number of drums will be provided; drummers are encouraged to bring their own drums. Dancers are welcome! Admission: $15 walk-in ($100 in advance for all eight sessions); $10 walk-in student rate ($70 in advance for eight sessions). For more information or to register, call 215.898.2680.

Mandarin SquareJanuary 13
Sunday, 1:00 - 4:00 pm
Family Second Sunday Workshop
Special Squares
Mandarin squares, or rank badges—large and colorful embroidered badges featuring animal insignias—were once sewn onto the coats of officials in Imperial China. In this workshop, guests design their own Mandarin square through collage. This walk-in workshop is free with Museum admission. For more information, call 215.898.4016.

 

January 13
Sunday, 2:00 pm
Second Sunday Culture Films Series
A Hospice in Amsterdam (2005)
Director Steef P.M. Meyknecht worked for three years as a volunteer at the Veerhuis Hospice in Amsterdam, which provides end-of-life care for senior citizens. In this film, he gives the audience an unblinking, empathic look at a time of life often hidden from view. After the film, Dr. Nora Jones, Penn Medical Ethics & Health Policy, engages audience members in a discussion about the marginality of the terminally ill, and the place of death in society. Cosponsored by the Department of Medical Ethics & Health Policy, and Penn Cinema Studies. Free with Museum Admission. For more information, call 215.898.2680.

Great PyramidJanuary 17
Thursday, 6:15 pm
Evening Lecture
Secret of the Great Pyramid
The Great Pyramid of Giza is one of the greatest unsolved mysteries of all time. Egyptologists simply do not know how ancient builders raised thousands of two-ton blocks to the top of a 480-foot pyramid. Beginning in 2003, Dr. Bob Brier, Senior Research Fellow, Long Island University/LIU Post, worked with French architect Jean Pierre Houdin to find evidence for a theory—that hidden inside the pyramid is a mile-long ramp, still waiting to be discovered, which was used to build the structure to such great heights. In this lecture, Dr. Brier discusses recent findings that offer support for this theory. Sponsored by the Philadelphia Chapter of the Archaeological Institute of America. Free admission. For more information, call 215.898.2680.

January 18
Friday, 5:30 pm - Saturday, 9:00 am
Sleepover Program
40 Winks with the Sphinx
Penn Museum's popular sleepover program, geared to ages 6–12 and their families or chaperones, invites guests to an overnight "expedition" of the Museum. The night's activities take intrepid explorers on a journey through time and across continents, with hands-on games, crafts, and more! A scavenger hunt and a flashlight expedition through the galleries offer new ways to connect with the ancient artifacts awaiting discovery. Later in the night, explorers roll out their sleeping bags to doze at the foot of the largest granite Sphinx in the Western Hemisphere! For more information, go to www.penn.museum/40Winks or call 215.898.2680.

January 23
Wednesday, 7:30 pm
Apocalypse Film Series
Mad Max: Beyond Thunderdome (1985)
Is the Maya apocalypse just arriving late? Moviegoers can find out how to survive (or how not to survive) Armageddon with the final installment in this series of apocalyptic scenario films. In Mad Max: Beyond Thunderdome, Mel Gibson struggles to make his way in the dystopian city of Bartertown. Audience members can learn how to cope with life in the desert, and compete in a Mad Max trivia contest at intermission! Cash bar and snacks available. Admission: Pay-what-you-want. For more information, call 215.898.2680.

January 24
Thursday, 12:30 pm
Brown Bag Lecture
Saint Helena – A Lost Island?
Saint Helena is, conceptually and physically, in the middle of a triangle, with points in the Americas, England and India. Once a global crossroads, its cliffs are now hung with 17th-century fortifications, sliding into the crashing South Atlantic. Plantation houses litter its valleys, decayed and choked by jungle. And a unique cemetery of thousands of slaves, freed from the clutches of the later trade, is threatened by development. In this lecture, Ben Jeffs, Director, Blackfreighter Archaeology and Conservation, speaks about fragile potential on one of the most remote inhabited places on Earth, and a four-year project to explore and save it. Sponsored by the Penn Cultural Heritage Center. Free admission. For more information, call 215.746.4475.

SleepoverJanuary 25
Friday, 5:30 pm - Saturday, 9:00 am
Sleepover Program
40 Winks with the Sphinx
Penn Museum's popular sleepover program, geared to ages 6–12 and their families or chaperones, invites guests to an overnight "expedition" of the Museum. The night's activities take intrepid explorers on a journey through time and across continents, with hands-on games, crafts, and more! A scavenger hunt and a flashlight expedition through the galleries offer new ways to connect with the ancient artifacts awaiting discovery. Later in the night, explorers roll out their sleeping bags to doze at the foot of the largest granite Sphinx in the Western Hemisphere! For more information, go to www.penn.museum/40Winks or call 215.898.2680.

January 26
Saturday, 1:00 pm
Afternoon Lecture
Sags, Bags, and Wrinkles in Roman Portraiture
When one visualizes the Roman Republic, the first image that usually comes to mind is that of a male aristocrat whose portrait bears the signs of advanced age: incised lines on or around the forehead, eyes, and mouth, and short, closely cropped hair that is often receding. On occasion there is no hair at all, and the irregularly shaped heads frequently feature large ears, thick lips, and sharply aquiline noses. Why did the Romans choose such an unusual type, and how long did it remain in vogue? In this lecture, Dr. C. Brian Rose, Curator-in-Charge, Mediterranean Section, answers these and other questions about Roman portraits, and presents new archaeological evidence from the northern Galilee that bears on the date of the type's creation. A workshop on making ancient Roman wax masks accompanies the lecture. This lecture is free with Museum admission. Workshop: $30. Advance registration required; to register, call 215.898.2680.

CNY1February 2
Saturday, 11:00 am - 4:00 pm
World Culture Day
Chinese New Year Celebration
Visitors ring in the Chinese Year of the Snake—and learn more about how the Lunar New Year is celebrated throughout Asia—at this 32nd annual, daylong extravaganza celebration. Guests can bring the whole family and celebrate the New Year with a wide variety of music and dance performances, children's activities, storytelling, arts and crafts, and martial and healing arts workshops. The day ends with a drum roll, a roar, and the popular Lion Dance parade. Free with Museum admission. For more information, call 215.898.2680.

February 6
Wednesday, 6:00 pm
"Great Battles" Evening Lecture
From Actium to an Asp: The Beginning of the End for Cleopatra the Great
In the years following the death of Julius Caesar in 44 BCE, internal Roman power struggles—combined with the increasingly negative response to Cleopatra VII and Marc Antony's romantic partnership—led to the deterioration of the relationship between Egypt and Rome. The conflict ultimately came to a head with the Battle of Actium in September of 31 BCE, in which the Egyptian forces were decimated at sea by the Romans—with Cleopatra and Marc Antony barely escaping with their lives. The aftermath of this battle set the course for the final desperate year of Cleopatra's life. Dr. Jennifer Wegner, Associate Curator, Egyptian Section, speaks at this "Great Battles: Moments in Time that Changed History" series lecture program. Admission with advance registration: $5; $10 at the door based on availability. To register, visit www.penn.museum/greatbattles. For more information, call 215.898.2680.

Lod MosaicFebruary 10
Sunday, 1:00 pm
Exhibition Opening and Ribbon Cutting
Unearthing a Masterpiece: A Roman Mosaic from Lod, Israel
Dr. Julian Siggers, Williams Director of the Penn Museum, cuts the ribbon to open this new exhibition. Over 300 square feet large and nearly 2,000 years old, this ancient Roman floor mosaic is one of the world's largest and best preserved. Discovered in 1996 in Lod, Israel (near Tel Aviv), the "Lod Mosaic" is often characterized as an archaeological gem. Guests can learn about the mosaic's discovery, history and conservation in this limited time exhibition, and see this unique masterpiece in its final United States venue before it becomes the permanent focus of the Shelby White and Leon Levy Lod Mosaic Center in Israel. The Lod Mosaic is on loan from the Israel Antiquities Authority and the Shelby White and Leon Levy Lod Mosaic Center. Free with Museum admission. For more information, call 215.898.2680.

February 10
Sunday, 2:00 pm
Afternoon Lecture
Deciphering the Lod Mosaic
Highway construction in Lod, Israel in 1966 accidently unearthed a large and well-preserved Roman mosaic that probably once decorated a large audience room. The mosaic dates to circa 300 CE and features a kind of arena of ferocious animals, including a lion and lioness, an elephant, a giraffe, a rhinoceros, a tiger, and a wild bull. In this lecture, Dr. C. Brian Rose, Curator-in-Charge, Mediterranean Section, explores why decorative motifs of this kind were held in such high esteem during the Roman Empire. That exploration leads us into the world of gladiatorial games, the wild animal export industry, and mythological charades in ancient Rome. Free with Museum admission. For more information, call 215.898.2680.

February 10
Sunday, 1:00 - 4:00 pm
Family Second Sunday Workshop
Marvelous Mosaics
The remarkable Lod Mosaic from Israel, on special display through May 12, complements the Roman mosaics from the Museum's permanent collections. Workshop guests draw inspiration from artwork of the ancients to piece together their own mosaic. This walk-in workshop is presented in conjunction with the opening of the new exhibition, Unearthing a Masterpiece: A Roman Mosaic from Lod, Israel. Free with Museum admission. For more information, call 215.898.4016.

February 10
Sunday, 2:00 pm
Second Sunday Culture Films Series
El Olvido (2008)
Director Heddy Honigmann introduces us to the Highland Inca people of Peru, many of whom have relocated to the capital city of Lima. In this highly original film, their stories offer startlingly personal views of recent political history and the effect of emigration on their lives. After the movie, Ann Farnsworth-Alvear, Professor, Penn Latin American and Latino Studies, leads audience members in a discussion about people at the fringes of Peruvian society, exploring what a compassionate view of them can reveal. Cosponsored by Penn Latin American and Latino Studies and Penn Cinema Studies. Free with Museum admission. For more information, call 215.898.2680.

PompeiiFrescoFebruary 12
Tuesday, 6:30 pm
Young Friends Event
Fifty Shades of Pompeii
Buried by thick layers of ash and mud from the volcanic eruption of Mt. Vesuvius in 79 CE, the erotic art of Pompeii has enthralled and embarrassed audiences since its rediscovery in the 18th century. These explicit, salacious paintings of ancient Rome rival any page of today's most popular steamy novels. Visitors are invited to join the Young Friends of the Penn Museum as they explore the murals and mosaics of Pompeii with speaker Dr. C. Brian Rose, Curator-in-Charge, Mediterranean Section, at this annual Valentine's event. A cocktail and dessert reception follows, with a cash bar available. Admission: $10. To purchase tickets, visit www.penn.museum/50shadesofpompeii. For more information, call 215.898.5093.

February 13
Wednesday, 6:00 pm
P.M. @ Penn Museum
2nd Wednesday Quizzo
Trivia buffs can test their knowledge and compete for prizes at Quizzo. The Pepper Mill Café, where the game is on, offers happy hour specials and appetizers until 7:30 pm. For more information, call 215.898.2680.

ToddMarcusFebruary 20
Wednesday, 6:30 pm
P.M. @ Penn Museum
Jazz Concert with The Todd Marcus Quartet
The Todd Marcus Quartet presents the release of its new album "Inheritance" – a straight-ahead jazz recording featuring the rare use of Marcus's bass clarinet as a lead horn. The group showcases arrangements of jazz standards, as well as Marcus's original compositions, which often feature Middle Eastern influences reflecting Marcus's Middle Eastern heritage. Their music departs from more common usages of bass clarinet, which tend to lean heavily toward avant-garde and free jazz styles. With Xavier Davis (piano), Eric Wheeler (bass), and Eric Kennedy (drums). Admission: $15. For tickets, go to www.penn.museum. For more information, call 215.898.2680.

February 21
Thursday, 12:30 pm
Brown Bag Lecture
Ancient Artifacts In Court: How the Case of Rubin v. Iran Could Affect Museums
In this lunchtime lecture, Laina Lopez, an attorney with Berliner, Corcoran & Rowe, LLP, will discuss whether the cultural heritage of another country can be put up for sale by United States courts to satisfy judgments for the victims of terrorism. Sponsored by the Penn Cultural Heritage Center. Free admission. For more information, call 215.746.4475.

February 22
Friday, 5:30 pm - Saturday, 9:00 am
Sleepover Program
40 Winks with the Sphinx
Penn Museum's popular sleepover program, geared to ages 6–12 and their families or chaperones, invites guests to an overnight "expedition" of the Museum. The night's activities take intrepid explorers on a journey through time and across continents, with hands-on games, crafts, and more! A scavenger hunt and a flashlight expedition through the galleries offer new ways to connect with the ancient artifacts awaiting discovery. Later in the night, explorers roll out their sleeping bags to doze at the foot of the largest granite Sphinx in the Western Hemisphere! For more information, go to www.penn.museum/40Winks or call 215.898.2680.

Priceless - JacketFebruary 27
Wednesday, 6:00 pm
Year of Proof Lecture
Recovering the Priceless: The Proof is in the Undercover Operation to Regain our Heritage
Robert K. Wittman, former Senior Investigator/Founder of the FBI's National Art Crime Team and author of the New York Times bestseller, Priceless: How I Went Undercover to Rescue the World's Stolen Treasures, is responsible for the recovery of more than $300 million worth of stolen art and cultural property. As an FBI Special Agent, Wittman conducted investigations throughout the world, often working undercover to rescue artifacts that ran the gamut from stolen Rembrandt's, to tomb-robbed ancient Peruvian golden artifacts, to Geronimo's eagle-feathered war bonnet. In this engrossing lecture, Wittman talks about the "proofs" necessary to solve these types of cases and the lengths to which investigators must go to get the job done. Free admission. Registration suggested; to register, go to www.penn.museum. For more information, call 215.898.2680.

 

The University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology is dedicated to the study and understanding of human history and diversity. Founded in 1887, the Museum has sent more than 400 archaeological and anthropological expeditions to all the inhabited continents of the world. With an active exhibition schedule and educational programming for children and adults, the Museum offers the public an opportunity to share in the ongoing discovery of humankind's collective heritage.

Penn Museum is located at 3260 South Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (on Penn's campus, across from Franklin Field). Public transportation to the Museum is available via SEPTA's Regional Rail Line at University City Station; the Market-Frankford Subway Line at 34th Street Station; trolley routes 11, 13, 34, and 36; and bus routes 12, 21, 30, 40, and 42. Museum hours are Tuesday and Thursday through Sunday, 10:00 am to 5:00 pm, and Wednesday, 10:00 am to 8:00 pm, with P.M. @ PENN MUSEUM evening programs offered weekly. Closed Mondays and holidays. Admission is $12 for adults; $10 for senior citizens (65 and above); $8 children (6 to 17) and full-time students with ID; free to Members, PennCard holders, and children 5 and younger; "pay-what-you-want" the last hour before closing. Penn Museum can be found on the web at www.penn.museum. For general information call 215.898.4000. For group tour information call 215.746.8183.

Photo captions: Dr. Gregory J.W. Urwin discusses the real significance of the Battle of Gettysburg, Wednesday, January 2 at 6:00 pm, as part of the "Great Battles: Moments in Time that Changed History" lecture series; Families can learn about Chinese culture and make their own Mandarin square to take home at this Family Second Sunday Workshop, presented Sunday, January 13, 1:00 to 4:00 pm at the Penn Museum (photo: Penn Museum); Dr. Bob Brier of Long Island University/LIU Post discusses a theory of how the Great Pyramid was actually constructed, Thursday, January 17, 6:15 pm at the Penn Museum (photo: Nina Aldin Thune); Kids and families can enjoy a real night at the museum with Penn Museum's "40 Winks with the Sphinx" sleepover program, Friday, January 25 (photo: Penn Museum); A youngster participates in the Lion Dance to ring in the Lunar New Year at Penn Museum's Chinese New Year Celebration, Saturday, February 2 from 11:00 am to 4:00 pm (photo: Penn Museum); This image shows a detail of the Roman mosaic from Lod, the centerpiece of a new display at Penn Museum opening Sunday, June 10 (credit: photograph © Israel Antiquities Authority); This evocative fresco from ancient Pompeii, and others like it, are the subject of this Valentine's lecture at Penn Museum, presented Tuesday, February 12 at 6:30 pm (image courtesy C. Brian Rose); Todd Marcus and his jazz quartet perform at the Penn Museum on Wednesday, February 20 at 6:30 pm (photo by Carlyle Smith [Soulfotography]); Former FBI Special Agent and bestselling author Robert K. Wittman speaks about art crimes in this lecture, Wednesday, February 27, 6:00 pm at the Penn Museum (image © Crown Publishing Group).

MUSEUM LOCATION

3260 South Street
Philadelphia, PA 19104
(215) 898-4000

MUSEUM HOURS

Tuesday-Sunday: 10:00am - 5:00pm
First Wednesdays: 10:00am - 8:00pm
Monday: CLOSED

RESOURCES
CONNECT

Sign up for our e-newsletter


Trip Advisor
University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology | Penn Logo
3260 South Street | Philadelphia, PA 19104 | (215) 898-4000 | Contacts

With Art Philadelphia