University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology

Category: Egypt


Sharing a Passion for Ancient Egypt, or Who Is as Smart as a Nine-Year-Old?

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By: Pam Kosty

More than 23,000 people from around the world signed up to take Introduction to Ancient Egypt and Its Civilization, a free online class with Dr. David Silverman, Curator-in-Charge of the Penn Museum’s Egyptian Section, via Coursera. I am one of those 23,000 people. And now a confession: I started the class, but grew nervous about […]


The Shena of Senwosret at Abydos – Paul Verhelst

Summer 2016 Penn Excavation Team. Front row staring from the left: Dr. Josef Wegner, Dr. Jennifer Houser-Wegner, Alexander Wegner, and Danny Doyle. Back row starting from the left: Molly Gleeson and Paul Verhelst. Photo by Dr. Jennifer Houser-Wegner.

By: Anne Tiballi

For my fourth consecutive summer, I returned to Egypt to work on Dr. Josef Wegner’s project at the mortuary complex of Senwosret III, located within the ancient site of Abydos. As with previous seasons, I helped excavate around the Senwosret III tomb enclosure, which is part of a mortuary complex that consists of the tomb […]


Conservation of Kaipure’s Tomb Chapel

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By: Emily Brown

Hello from the Egypt (Sphinx) Gallery (or Lower Egypt as we often call it here at the Penn Museum)! We are Emily Brown and Madeleine Neiman, two project conservators working on the Vibration Mitigation Project at the Penn Museum. Currently, we are working in view of the public on an Old Kingdom tomb chapel (Figure […]


Confronting Death at the Penn Museum

This is me, up-close and personal with our mummy Nespekashuti.

By: Molly Gleeson

After three years of working on ancient Egyptian mummies In the Artifact Lab, I’ve gotten used to being around death every day. And, in reality, all of us here at the Museum are surrounded by death – many artifacts in our collection were excavated from tombs and relate to funerary practices and provide intimate connections […]


Sealings, Snakes, and Sacred Lakes: A Report from the 2015 Summer Season at Abydos – Part 1- Paul Verhelst

My kufti Ramadan, in the tan gellabiya, oversees the excavation of my unit in the areryt debris deposit. Excavation in Wah-sut usually involves removing the debris mounds from past excavations and the garbage that accumulates from the modern village of el-Araba.

By: Sarah Linn

Every year, the Penn Museum provides support to Penn undergraduates and graduate students as they deepen their understanding of the human experience outside the Museum’s walls. Follow these blog posts from our intrepid young scholars as they report on the sights and sites that they encounter throughout their travels in the field. Every excavation season […]


On Maadi and Migration – Emily Sutcliffe

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By: Anne Tiballi

Every year, the Penn Museum provides support to Penn undergraduates and graduate students as they deepen their understanding of the human experience outside the Museum’s walls. Follow these blog posts from our intrepid young scholars as they report on the sights and sites that they encounter throughout their travels in the field. Prior to my […]


LiDAR Scans and Sacred Lakes: A Report from the 2014 Summer Season at Abydos- Part 2

Houmdi (left) and I (right) at his daughter’s wedding, sitting in the courtyard of his home built within the area of the Malih. Photo from Jamie Kelly

By: Paul Verhelst

In my previous post, I talked about the technological methods utilized in Abydos this season. Another major part of my season at Abydos was to do a preliminary investigation of the sacred lake associated with the Osiris temple. The remnants of this sacred lake, known now as the Malih or the Salty, survived into the […]


LiDAR Scans and Sacred Lakes: A Report from the 2014 Summer Season at Abydos- Part 1

A LiDAR scan of Senebkay’s tomb

By: Paul Verhelst

This summer at Abydos promised to be a busy and exciting season. The Penn research team (dubbed Team Hafla, which is Arabic for “party”) returned to Abydos after an exciting winter season with the discovery of King Senebkay and the Lost Abydos Dynasty. We were ready to continue exploring the cemetery around Senebkay as well […]


Archives Photo of the Week: Mosquee Assan Pacha, fontane des Ablutions. Caire.

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By: Eric Schnittke

 I came across this week’s photo by chance and was just mesmerized by it. Taken by Maison Bonfils, it depicts a fountain inside of the Sultan Hassan Mosque in Cairo, Egypt. The photograph was taken in the late 1800s and is an 8.75″ x 11″ albumen print. The fountain and mosque still exist today and […]


Rediscovering a Forgotten Egyptian Pharaoh: A Penn Student’s Experience in the Field

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By: Tom Stanley

In January, researchers from the Penn Museum made an historic discovery in Abydos, Egypt—unearthing the tomb and skeletal remains of a previously unknown pharaoh, Woseribre Senebkay, who reigned in the 17th century BCE. The finding was the culmination of work at the site that began in summer 2013 by a team led by Dr. Josef […]


Magic in the Ancient World

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