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Volume 1 : Articles

Relevant Information About Menander

By: Temple Fay

In general we know comparatively little about the life history and personal traits of ancient worthies. The evidence for Menander comes from Greek of Latin writings or from inscriptions and is conveniently assembled near the beginning of the second volume of Koerte’s edition of Menander. The Suda (Suidas), a tenth-century work of reference, informs us […]


Ancient and Primitive Art in Philadelphia Collections

object #1

By: David Crownover

Art of any period or time has been seen to pass through a life cycle: dynamic in youth, overcome by nature in middle age, philosophic in decline. Jacques Lipchitz, a sculptor, collector, and connoisseur, sees this theory in a new light. He contends that contemporary art is the beginning of a new cycle; that the […]


Museum News – Summer 1959

Hasanlu, Iran The members of the expedition to Hasanlu, under the leadership of Robert H. Dyson, Jr., arrived in Iran early in June. This year the Metropolitan Museum of Art is sponsoring the dig along with the Iranian Government and the University Museum. The Metropolitan’s representative is De. Vaughn E. Crawford who is acting as […]


“The Head” – Menander

A Neurosurgeon's Analysis of a Great Stone Portrait

By: Temple Fay and Jack L. Benson and L. Arnold Post

Preface Undoubtedly the most controversial portrait surviving from antiquity is one which exists in many copies and which has most often been identified as either Menander or Vergil, although speculation has ranged more widely than that. It may well be that various scholars who have accepted one or the other identification have satisfied themselves on […]


Tikal 1959

By: William R. Coe

At this Maya site in northern tropical Guatemala the fourth season of field work under the direction of Edwin M. Shook continues. The Museum’s objectives, undertaken in collaboration with the Guatemala Government, are gradually being realized. Our initial difficulties with a dependable water supply have been solved. Excavations, laboratory work, reconstruction and consolidation, analysis of […]


Portrait of a Hero

By: Kenneth D. Matthews, Jr.

Between 1931 and 1933 workmen under the direction of Jotham Johnson labored for the University Museum at a Roman site not far north of the Bay of Naples. The ancient Romans knew the town as Minturnae and many entered its gates as transient guests en route to resorts, further south, for the heavily traveled Via […]


The Art of Benin

Benin Artwork Statue

By: Margaret Plass

An evaluation based on discussions with William Fagg, Deputy Keeper of Ethnography in the British Museum. The art of Benin is the most widely known of all forms of “primitive” art, yet it is also the least typical. It is, moreover, the most highly valued, and indeed, as to a great part of its output, […]


Siberians of the New World

Photo of woman working with walrus skin.
An archaeologist spends the summer on St. Lawrence Island.

By: Robert Ackerman

Far to the north in the region of the Bering Straits, Russian and American archaeologists working independently of each other are trying to reconstruct the culture history of the most northerly hunters of the world, the Eskimo. Recent information from the excavations in the East Cape region of Siberia and the coast to the south […]


Archaeological Visitors

By: Alfred Kidder, II

I first became aware of the archaeological visitors (we called them tourists), in the early twenties, when our family used to spend the summer at the ruins of the old Pueblo of Pecos, about thirty-five miles east of Santa Fe. My father was then engaged in a long-term program of excavation on the remains of […]


Where in the World?

masks

Museum News: Hasanlu, Iran The members of the expedition to Hasanlu, under the leadership of Robert H. Dyson, Jr., arrived in Iran early in June. This year the Metropolitan Museum of Art is sponsoring the dig along with the Iranian Government and the University Museum. The Metropolitan’s representative is Dr. Vaughn E. Crawford who is […]