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Volume 14 : Articles

A Greek Metalworking Quarter

Eighth Century Excavations on Ischia

By: Jeffrey Klein

Ancient notices of the Greek colony of Pithekoussai, the present island of Ischia in the Bay of Naples, are surprisingly scanty and often contradictory. Its early history seems to have been as obscure to ancient writers as it was to modern scholars before systematic archaeological explo­ration began there in recent years. Even the significance of […]


Cruise of the United States Frigate Potomac

By: Karen Goodrich-Hedrick and John D. Hedrick

Sir Mortimer Wheeler’s dictum, “Dead archaeology is the driest dust that blows” is too often realized in ethnological specimens relegated to “storage” in large museums. Sterile and life­less, artifacts lie in neatly arranged rows or hopelessly jumbled piles collecting the dust of time. That these objects were once part of dynamic, living societies—collected by living […]


The Buried Past of Dehli

By: B.K. Thapar

According to popular belief there have been eight imperial cities of Delhi of which New Delhi, or Raisina as it is called by the less sophisticated, is the most recent. New Delhi, planned in the twenties of the present century by Edwin Lutyens, is the last in this series of eight cities. Qila Rai Pithora […]


Excavations in the Swamps of Sumer

By: Vaughn E. Crawford

My first visit to Al-Hiba was in November, 1953, when 1 was a member of an archaeological survey led by Thorkild Jacobsen of the Oriental Institute. At that time we spent a few hours examining this huge tell where we are presently working. Since neither W. K. Loftus who visited and made soundings at many […]


New Treasures From Nigeria

By: Ekpo O. Eyo

Recent excavations in western Nigeria conducted by the Department of Antiquities of the Government of Nigeria indicate that the town of Owo—situated between Ife and Benin—may provide long-sought clues to the puzzling inter­relationships which link those two famous art centers. Though our analysis is not yet complete, the quality and quantity of the finds must […]


A Doomed Aqueduct

By: Alfred Friendly

A unique and fascinating portion of one of the finest aqueducts of the Roman world will be lost in the next few years to the march of progress, doomed to disappear under the waters of a new dam in Southern Turkey. The portion that will be flooded, about six kilometers from the beginning of the […]


An Ancient Natural Disaster

By: Payson D. Sheets

Recent geological and archaeological investigations in Chalchuapa, El Salvador, together have provided the probable answer to a question which has long puzzled students of the history of the Maya. The question: Why are there throughout the Maya area numerous instances of the sudden appearance of a full-blown Maya Protoclassic civilization, whereas a more normal, progressive […]


The Phoenicians in Their Homeland

By: James B. Pritchard

The Phoenician expansion westward for three thousand miles across the Mediterranean and beyond to the shores of the Atlantic was a response to pressure. In the thirteenth and twelfth centuries B.C. the Canaanites of Palestine-Syria found themselves hard-pressed by the arrival of new and hostile peoples in what had long been their fertile homeland. Hebrews infiltrated […]


Is There a Culture of Poverty?

By: Thomas C. Greaves

What, if anything, culture has to do with poverty is one of the great issues of contem­porary cultural anthropology. This is so because urban poverty generates increasing conflict and moral outrage in our society, because it has been intractable to solution despite the investment of enormous effort and resources, and because a number of very […]


Ancient Egypt and Black Africa

Early Contacts

By: David O'Connor

In 1955 a west African scholar, Marcel Diop, argued vehemently that professional Egyptolo­gists had been concealing a startling fact for over half a century; Diop claimed that the ancient Egyptians were Negroes and their characteristic civilization was a Negro achievement. It is in fact a not uncommon belief that Egypt was part of Black Africa, […]