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Volume 3 : Articles

Three Shipwrecked Scarabs

By: Alan R. Schulman

Among the objects recovered last summer by a University Museum expedition from a Bronze Age ship lost off Cape Gelidonya, Turkey* are three Egyptian scarabs which are of value in establishing the date of the wreck. One of the scarabs is of particular significance in this regard. On it, the god Re, represented as a […]


A Mask of Turtle Shell

By: David Crownover

Between the Cape of York Peninsula in Australia and the southeast tip of land along the Papuan Gulf of New Guinea, lie the Torres Straits. The people who live on the islands in the Straits have been creating paraphernalia to complement their ritual life for centuries. The University Museum has recently acquired by purchase a […]


A Visit to a Chittagong Hill Tribe

Photo of statue.

By: Robert H. Dyson, Jr.

Much of the initial information gathered on foreign peoples has been derived from the accounts of travelers. Such accounts are usually of an informal nature involving personal experiences seldom included in technical anthropological studies. Yet the very intimacy of such personal contacts, combined with the traveler’s observations on foreign customs, documents in a manner similar […]


A Sculpture from Mexico

By: William R. Coe

The New World archaeological collections of the University Museum are comprehensive, often superlative. But we are aware of certain shortcomings. One of these is a good synoptic display collection from the central portion of the Mexican State of Veracruz, on the Gulf Coast. In a recent gift by Major General Littleton W. T. Walter, a […]


Ancient Peruvian Textile Arts

Patchwork and Tie-dye From Pachacamac

By: Ina Vanstan

Digging up the past includes more than the actual spade work with the essential on-the-spot record keeping and the basic interpretations undertaken in the field. It involves, also, detailed analyses of any materials collected, analyses which must be made in the laboratory and followed by observations and interpretations based on the findings. Frequently, due to […]


The Bible Reports on Gibeon

image of handle

By: James B. Pritchard

A new dimension was added to the archaeological remains at el-Jib by the discovery in 1956 of a handle from a wine jug on which were scratched the four letters GBcN, the Hebrew spelling of the well-known biblical city of Gibeon. In the three subsequent campaigns twenty-nine more handles inscribed with “Gibeon” were found. This […]


The American Kalmyks

photo of monks

By: Fred Adelman

After an odyssey of more than three centuries a group of Mongolian Buddhists has come to Philadelphia and nearby New Jersey to settle. Their name for themselves is mana khalyamik emtn, “our Kalmyk people,” but they have accepted the westernized versions, Kalmyk, Kalmuk, or Kalmuck. The forebears of the Kalmyks came from the pasturelands of Jungaria, between […]


Easter Eggs and Easter Bread of Southeastern Pennsylvania

By: Margaret L. Arnott

Among folklorists it is a well known fact that one does not look in the center to find traditions but rather to the distant places, because it is the people on the edge of any culture who keep that culture alive. So it is that we may look inlands to which people have emigrated to […]


Expedition News – Spring 1961

Tikal, Guatemala The Expedition at Tikal which has been at work since the end of January will close its 1961 season in late May. Full-time members of the Expedition staff this year have been Alfred Kidder II, Edwin M. Shook, Aubrey Trik, and William R. Coe. Shorter visits to the site have been made by […]


An Ivory Gorgoneion

By: G. Roger Edwards

Of all the sculptural work of Greek antiquity, that in ivory is among the least well known to us from preserved examples, although the fame of Greek work in ivory has come down to us abundantly in literature. Ivory itself endures well, but burial in damp earth has caused most Greek carvings in this material […]