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Mediterranean Section

A Red-Figured Stamnos of the Periklean Period

By: E. H. H.

Volume V / Number 1

Throughout the history of Attic vases, a subject frequently employed by the potters for the painted scenes which decorated their wares was the departure of a warrior. In the sixth century the customary method of treating the scene was to represent the warrior as mounting a chariot in the presence of his family and friends, […]


A Red-Figured Amphora Signed by the Potter Meno

By: E. H. H.

Volume V / Number 1

The Museum has had in its possession since 1896 a red-figured amphora decorated with two scenes which for precision, delicacy, and vigor of drawing compare favorably with the best work produced by Attic vase-painters of the early period. On the foot of the vase are scratched the words Μενονεποιεσεν, Mena made (me). Nothing is known […]


A Neo-Attic Relief and a Roman Portrait Head

By: E. H. H.

Volume V / Number 1

Two marbles, acquired by the Museum in the autumn of 1913, are now on exhibition in the newly arranged room on. the second floor. They both date from the Roman era but represent the diametrically opposed methods of two distinct schools of sculpture. The one is a relief of the class called neo-Attic; the other […]


A Seated Dionysos

By: E. H. H.

Volume IV / Number 4

The last addition to the Lucy Wharton Drexel collection of Roman sculpture acquired only a short time before the death of the donor is a life-sized marble statue representing a nude figure of a man seated on a rock over which a panther’s skin is spread, and resting his right arm on the head of […]


A Red-Figured Kylix

Graeco-Roman Section

By: E. H. H.

Volume IV / Number 4

Among the objects which have been cleaned during the summer of 1913 and from which modern restorations have been removed is the red-figured kylix shown in Fig. 140, decorated with a picture of a boy about to sacrifice a pig. Attention has already been called to this example of Greek vase-painting. The removal of restorations […]


Attic Vases from Orvieto

By: E. H. H.

Volume IV / Number 4

In 1897, through the generosity of Mr. John Wanamaker, the Museum secured two boxes of fragments of antique vases which had been excavated from tombs at Orvieto. The two black-figured amphora portraying the birth of Athena, which were described in a recent number of the MUSEUM JOURNAL, and a number of other vases were put […]


A Roman Relief from Pozzuoli

By: E. H. Hall

Volume IV / Number 4

In the last ten years an attempt has been made to reinstate Roman art in the proud place it occupied in the eighteenth century. Then before the Elgin marbles were brought to London or the Hermes of Praxiteles was unearthed, such statues as the Apollo Belvedere, such monuments as the column of Trajan were regarded […]


A Collection Made of Antique Glass

By: E. H. Hall

Volume IV / Number 4

The process of making glass was invented, according to Pliny, in the following manner. ” That part of Syria which borders on Judea., and is called Phoenicia, has at the foot of Mt. Cannel a swamp named Cendevia. Here rises the river Belus which, after a course of five miles, empties into the sea near […]


The Graeco-Roman Section

Volume IV / Number 4

The progress made by the Museum in 1913 includes no more important step than the development and scientific treatment of the collections in the Graeco-Roman Section. These collections were augmented by purchases of Roman glass, a Neo-Attic marble relief and a Roman portrait head in marble. Another relief, of Imperial Roman type, purchased in 1908, […]


Two Black-Figured Amphoræ with Scenes Portraying the Birth of Athena

By: E. H. H.

Volume III / Number 4

WHEN, in 1904, the great German archæologist, Adolf Furt-waengler, paid a visit to this Museum, his attention was attracted by two large Greek amphora or wine-jars, decoarated with scenes portraying the birth of the goddess Athena. Upon his return to Europe, Furtwaengler presented at a meeting of the Munich Academy of Science a report of […]