University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Athropology


Author: Richard M. Leventhal

The Present and Future of the Museum

From the Director

By: Richard M. Leventhal

Over the next several issues of Expedition I would like to discuss some ideas related to museums in the mod­ern world. Specifically, I want to discuss how the Diversity of Pennsylvania Museum fits within the Diversity, the local community, and the broader inter­national immunity. I want this column to be a sounding board, not only […]


The University and the Museum

From the Director

By: Richard M. Leventhal

The formal name, the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology, clearly connects our museum to the larger Penn community. This connection to the University also defines our mission as one of both education and research. From the Museum’s founding in 1887, our mission has been to study modern and ancient cultures and their […]


Public Exhibits, Education, and Outreach

From the Director

By: Richard M. Leventhal

Two Questions that might be asked about the Penn Museum are: Why should we have a major public focus on exhibits, education, and out­reach? And why should people from Philadelphia and from the U.S. Northeast visit us? The answers rest upon the Museum’s mission, which exists on several levels. Our basic mission, like that of […]


The Amarna Exhibit

From the Director

By: Richard M. Leventhal and Richard M. Leventhal

On November 12, 2006, Penn Museum opened a new exhibit, Amarna, Ancient Egypt’s Place in the Sun. It is an important exhibit for many reasons, all of which exemplify the nature of the Museum’s research and outreach. First, the materials in this exhibit are from our own collections. These have been curated by three of […]


The Amarna Exhibit

From the Director

By: Richard M. Leventhal and Richard M. Leventhal

On November 12, 2006, Penn Museum opened a new exhibit, Amarna, Ancient Egypt’s Place in the Sun. It is an important exhibit for many reasons, all of which exemplify the nature of the Museum’s research and outreach. First, the materials in this exhibit are from our own collections. These have been curated by three of […]


Vine Deloria, Jr. (1933–2005)

From the Director

By: Richard M. Leventhal

In this issue I want to take a break from discussing the Penn Museum and note the passing of an individual of great importance to all Native peoples and those who study indigenous peoples. Vine Deloria, Jr., a Native American activist, author, historian, and theologian, died on November 13, 2005. During the course of his […]


The Penn Compact and Penn Museum

From the Director

By: Richard M. Leventhal

President Amy Gutmann’s vision for the University of Pennsylvania — “the Penn Compact”—articulates a three-part program focused upon the main principles of increased access, integrated knowledge, and local and global engagement. The connection between these principles and the vision and activities of Penn Museum is extremely strong. In fact, the Penn Compact fits the Museum better than perhaps […]


The Modern Maya and Recent History

By: Richard M. Leventhal and Carlos Chan Espinosa and Cristina Coc

The Maya are generally thought of in relation to their distant past—a past of great cities with towering stone pyramids rising up out of dense jungle. Exploring further, one encounters a complicated writing system, beautiful pottery, carved stelae, and elaborate ceremonies and rituals. Indeed, the history of the Maya began in ancient times ca. 2000 […]


Saving Syria’s Cultural Heritage

Past/Present

By: Richard M. Leventhal and Brian I. Daniels

The news from Syria is unbearable. Over 200,000 Syrians have been killed and the country’s population has been largely displaced. Many of Syria’s famous heritage sites have been seriously damaged or destroyed. Most of us feel helpless in the face of such human tragedy. But when Salam Al Kuntar fled to the U.S. and asked […]