University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Athropology


Author: William R. Coe

Tikal 1959

By: William R. Coe

At this Maya site in northern tropical Guatemala the fourth season of field work under the direction of Edwin M. Shook continues. The Museum’s objectives, undertaken in collaboration with the Guatemala Government, are gradually being realized. Our initial difficulties with a dependable water supply have been solved. Excavations, laboratory work, reconstruction and consolidation, analysis of […]


A Sculpture from Mexico

By: William R. Coe

The New World archaeological collections of the University Museum are comprehensive, often superlative. But we are aware of certain shortcomings. One of these is a good synoptic display collection from the central portion of the Mexican State of Veracruz, on the Gulf Coast. In a recent gift by Major General Littleton W. T. Walter, a […]


Expedition News – Fall 1963

By: Froelich Rainey and Rodney S. Young and Samuel Noah Kramer and William R. Coe

South Asia The Museum’s Director, Dr. Rainey, and Professor W. Norman Brown, Chairman of the South Asia Regional Studies Department of the University of Pennsylvania, announce the opening of a new program devoted to the archaeology of South Asia (India, Pakistan, Ceylon, Afghanistan). Dr. George F. Dales has received the joint appointment as Assistant Curator […]


Tikal

Photo of mask.
The North Acropolis and An Early Tomb

By: William R. Coe and John J. McGinn

What is it that motivates anticipation of a rich tomb as the trench is cut further and deeper back in time? The excavator knows the lure and now and then stops to ask himself the values to be gotten from the elusive tomb, from the rotted bones, the things worn by and later deposited with […]


Tikal

Photo of temple
Ten Years of Study of a Maya Ruin in the Lowlands of Guatemala

By: William R. Coe

Introduction By the end of 1966 the fieldwork of the Tikal Project will have ended, though understandable with small sense of completion on the part of the more than ninety staff members who have labored there cumulatively over the years. Tikal, in the forest of El Peten, in northern Guatemala, is too large and opulent […]