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Mediterranean Section

Two Vases from the Hegeman Collection

Recent Additions to the Classical Collections

By: E. H. Dohan

Volume XXI / Number 3-4

IN THE Spring of 1930, Miss Annie May Hegeman of Washington very generously lent to the University Museum three vases, one of which, an Attic black-figured panel amphora, is reproduced in Figures 1 and 2. On the obverse is represented Poseidon hurling the island Nisyros at the giant Polybotes; on the reverse, a quadriga full […]


A Lydian Imitation of a Laconian Vase

Recent Additions to the Classical Collections

By: E. H. Dohan

Volume XXIII / Number 1

In 1897, through the generosity of the late John Wanamaker, the Museum acquired a box of potsherds from Orvieto. To this purchase, as readers of the Journal will recall, the Museum owes many of its best Greek vases. Conspicuous at first sight in the mass of fragments which the purchase comprised were the pieces of […]


A Late Minoan Pyxis

Recent Additions to the Classical Collections

By: E. H. Dohan

Volume XXIII / Number 1

IN 1930 the Museum purchased from Paris the delicately painted pyxis of Figure 1. The buff clay of which it is made is imperfectly fired and ill-adapted to withstand the erosion and detrition to which it was subjected during the long period when it lay buried beneath the ground. There are many breaks and several […]


A Portrait of the Late Roman Empire

Recent Additions to the Classical Collections

By: Valentin Müller

Volume XXIII / Number 1

THE fourth century A.D. marks a turning-point in the history of the Mediterranean World. Permanent war against invading barbarians, inner civil struggles, social unrest and subsequent economic decline during the third century had brought the powerful Roman Empire near the abyss. But it was saved once more. The energetic Diocletian created a new political order […]


Four Vases from the Henry C. Lea Collection

Recent Additions to the Classical Collections

By: E. H. Dohan

Volume XXIII / Number 1

IN THE collection of Greek vases made by the late Henry C. Lea, which, through the generosity of his family, has now been presented to the University Museum, are several notable pieces. Of these the earliest is the eye-kylix of Figures 1 and 2, acquired by the Museum early in 1931 by gift of Arthur […]


Battle-Loutrophoros

Recent Additions to the Classical Collections

By: J. D. Beazley

Volume XXIII / Number 1

THE vase shown in Figures 1 to 17 is said to have been found at Athens. It has been reproduced, inadequately, in a London sale catalogue.1 When it was mending in England, I was able, through the kindness of the then owner, to study it, draw it, and have it photographed. It has now been […]


Three Greek Grave Monuments

By: Edith H. Dohan

Volume XIX / Number 3

IN Greek thought as in Christian, it was held an act of virtue to bury the dead, or rather, since the soul wandered helpless and hopeless until the body was laid to rest, it was considered an act of impiety not to give it burial. Only those who merited the extreme penalty were denied the […]


Recent Additions to the Collection of Greek Vases

By: Edith H. Dohan

Volume XIX / Number 1

A Bronze Age Cup Decorated with an Octopus NO one can travel far in the Eastern Mediterranean without encountering the octopus. On the table d’hôte of seaside restaurants are served neatly cut sections of his long arms, which taste, if one has the temerity to taste, something like our scallop. On wharves young boys swing […]


Head of Ariadne

Volume XV / Number 4

This marble head, said to have been found in Asia Minor, resembles closely one in the Athens Museum and another in Berlin, identified by Studniczka as the head of Ariadne. The statue to which the head belonged was evidently one of which several copies were made, but only the heads remain. It was the work […]


Coins from Magna Græcia and Sicily

By: Edith Hall Dohan

Volume XIV / Number 2

Coins are generally classed with the products of the Minor Arts, those arts which beautify the things man “handles and reads from and looks out of and kneels upon and laughs at and hunts with and in which he arrays himself, his family, and his house.”1 They are employed in the cheerful normal business of […]