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Volume XX / Number 3-4

1929

Announcement

Volume XX / Number 3-4

Beginning with Volume XXI, an alteration will be made in the scope of the Museum Journal. Hitherto, an effort has been made to combine in these pages the popular and the purely scientific. With the feeling that the latter aim has generally been sacrificed to the former, the editor has now determined in addition to […]


The Boudoir of Queen Shubad

By: L. Legrain

Volume XX / Number 3-4

QUEEN SHUBAD was so fond of her jewels that when she died in ancient Ur, six thousand years ago, they buried her in queenly state with all her regalia, so that her spirit might have rest. After so many centuries this treasure of feminine adornment is still a delight to the eyes. Her golden comb, […]


Scientific Notes on the Finds From Ur

By: Kenneth Graham

Volume XX / Number 3-4

I. Restoration of the Silver THE metallurgists of early times, as is well known, were able to produce bronzes of a composition and quality that have never been surpassed. In fact, their alloy containing approximately 90 per cent copper and 10 per cent tin is regarded as the best bronze composition for many purposes today. […]


Gem Cutters in Ancient Ur

By: L. Legrain

Volume XX / Number 3-4

“All the Babylonians,” says Herodotus, who visited the land in the days of Artaxerxes Longhand, “have a seal and they carry a stick on the top of which is an apple, a rose, a lily, an eagle or some other figure, for they may not carry a cane or a stick without a characteristic ornament.” […]


The Lock Haven Expedition

By: D. S. Davidson

Volume XX / Number 3-4

THE Lock Haven Expedition of the University Museum was organized in June, 1929, for the purpose of investigating the archæological sites along the western branch of the Susquehanna River and other regions in the western part of the state. The archæology of Pennsylvania, like that of the entire East with the exception of New York […]


The Texas Expedition

By: J. Alden Mason

Volume XX / Number 3-4

TEXAS, although the largest state in the Union, has been quite neglected by archæologists and therefore was chosen as the field of operations for one of the summer expeditions of the University Museum. The reason for this neglect is readily comprehensible: despite its size, Texas contains no ruins or archæological remains of outstanding interest. To […]


The Kaguanton Shark Helmet

By: Louis Shotridge

Volume XX / Number 3-4

AT last the Kaguanton Clan let go its oldest possession, the “Shark” Helmet (Plates XLVII and XLVIII). It is a very unique and ancient specimen, and so far as is known, the only one of its kind which existed in the land of the Tlingit. The helmet is made of the thickest part of the […]